Give Now NCPR is made possible by
Your Donations
 

NCPR News: Nora Flaherty, Reporter/producer

Show             

All Before Five: 06/22/12

A longer, darker story emerges in the case of convicted rapist Michael Scaringe--with sex abuse allegations going back to when Scaringe was a teacher in Tupper Lake in the '70s. The Franklin County DA says school officials never reported them to police. Also, at the last moment yesterday the state legislature approved constitutional amendments that will allow long-sought land swaps in the Adirondacks. And in the middle of a heat wave, the Olympic Regional Development Authority reports on its winter numbers: It was a slow year, but ORDA says a good one nonetheless.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Undoing what beavers hath wrought

Spring cleanup is a major feature of life in the North Country. After even a light winter like the one we just had, there's a lot of grit, leaves and mud to contend with. For Bruce Reynolds, it's a day's work: Reynolds cleans up trash, dead animals, and beaver dams for the state Department of Transportation.

Nora Flaherty caught up with Reynolds by the side of the road near Canton last spring, and he's today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article
Wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf
Wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf

Owens backs IJC water levels plan

North Country congressman Bill Owens says he's supporting the International Joint Commission's new water levels plan for the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

The plan, known as BV7, would replace one that's been in effect for 60 years. The old plan strictly regulated water levels; the new one will allow them to fluctuate more naturally.  Go to full article
Wells Memorial Library after Irene. Photo: Kate Messner
Wells Memorial Library after Irene. Photo: Kate Messner

Long Island elementary school raises $1400 for Wells Memorial Library

The Wells Memorial Library in Upper Jay will be getting a gift of about $1400 from a Long Island elementary school, to help the library continue its recovery from Tropical Storm Irene. The donation comes after the school--Shore Road Elementary in Bellmore--decided to use its annual 6th grade charity sale to raise money for the library.

Wells Memorial's children's section was almost completely destroyed by Irene last August. And library director Karen Rappaport says although it has mostly been restored, the library will still use most of the Shore Road elementary money for kids' materials.  Go to full article
Maybe we should turn our eye toward diversification, and that would certainly be in the area of tourism...

Brasher supervisor sees a casino in the future

Gov. Cuomo's proposal to expand gambling in New York gave one rural St. Lawrence County leader an idea.

"I was thinking when I read the governor's proposal to put seven casinos in New York State, I thought, why not put one in the northern tier? Maybe we could get one up here." Brasher Town Supervisor James Dawson told town board members last week a casino would be a great way to attract visitors to the region...and to pump up St. Lawrence County's flagging economy.

The 900 acres Dawson has in mind has already been considered for a racetrack and entertainment complex. That development failed, and the land ended up in bankruptcy court. Dawson told Nora Flaherty a casino there could anchor a host of spin-off development.  Go to full article
It'll [help] create an economic climate where we can begin to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps.

A casino in Brasher? Why not?!

A troubled parcel of more than 900 acres of land in Brasher and Norfolk may one day be a casino. At least, that's what Brasher Town Supervisor James Dawson is proposing. Dawson told town board members last week a casino would be a great way to attract visitors to the region...and to pump up St. Lawrence County's flagging economy.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has proposed a constitutional amendment to create seven commercial casinos across the state. Brasher is only a few miles from the Akwesasne Mohawk casino near Massena, and Dawson says two casinos in the area could make it a destination for Canadian tourists.  Go to full article
Photo: Luc Viato via Wikimedia Commons
Photo: Luc Viato via Wikimedia Commons

Red Admiral butterflies cover North Country

Over the last several days, much of the North Country has been virtually blanketed with small orangey-red butterflies.

They look like monarchs, but they're not. They're a species called Red Admirals, or Vanessa Atalanta. Red Admirals are native to this area, and some will settle here for the summer. Their caterpillars eat nettles so they're not a danger to crops. But we don't usually see this many, and they don't usually pass through this early in the year.  Go to full article
President Obama set out a "to do" list for members of Congress. Image: Whitehouse.gov
President Obama set out a "to do" list for members of Congress. Image: Whitehouse.gov

President Obama praises New York State tech businesses in Albany speech

President Barack Obama was warmly welcomed Tuesday at the University of Albany's nanotechnology center...and he used the occasion to praise the private-public partnership that funds the school.
Mr. Obama said the private sector is the quote-"true engine" of job creation in the US, not government--but that government can help, by making it easier for companies to hire new workers. And he said Congress isn't doing all it can.  Go to full article

No bomb evidence found after Canton Central School scare

Village and state police, investigators from the county sheriff's department and sniffer dogs didn't find evidence of a bomb at Canton Central School. The school was evacuated this morning after a high school student reported the word "bomb" written on a girls' bathroom stall.  Go to full article
Photo: rulfsorchard.com
Photo: rulfsorchard.com

Growers work to protect crops after warm March weather, last weekend's freeze

Record-breaking warm temperatures this March sped up the growing season in North Country orchards--with many fruit trees now in blossom well ahead of schedule. This weekend, low temperatures below freezing put those blossoms in danger, and raised questions about this year's yields.

Many orchardists spent much of the weekend trying to protect their crops--using bonfires, wind machines and water to keep frost from settling into fruit blossoms.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   31-40 of 186 stories   next 10 »   last »

Nora Flaherty got into public radio kind of by mistake--the local public radio station was in the same building as the office of the Anthropology department at the University of Michigan, where Nora was studying to be a professor. But after a few weeks as an intern, she was convinced she'd stumbled into the right place.

Nora became a reporter and on-air host at Michigan Radio, where she did stories on environmental issues, housing, the arts, among other things. Nora moved to New York City in 2005, and became a producer at WFUV. At WFUV, Nora hosted a weekly interview program and reported on the long-term issues faced by September 11th survivors, education, and less serious topics like fairy tales, freak shows and pop music.

A serious dog person, Nora loves hanging out with her "pack" (her husband and their dog), cooking, and driving in foreign countries.