Give Now NCPR is made possible by
Your Donations
 

NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

Show             
Raquette Lake could be near the end of a century-old land dispute with New York state.  Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Raquette_Lake,_New_York.jpg">DzikieKwiaty</a>, public domain
Raquette Lake could be near the end of a century-old land dispute with New York state. Photo: DzikieKwiaty, public domain

Settlement to century-old Adk land dispute in the mail

New York state is sending hundreds of letters to homeowners in Long Lake offering to settle land claims as part of the "Township 40" deal approved by voters last November.

The move is part of an effort to resolve boundary disputes around the tiny community of Raquette Lake that date back to the 1800s.

In all, more than 1,000 acres of land around Raquette Lake are affected by the boundary dispute, which was sparked originally by conflicting title claims, decades of lawsuits, and poor survey maps.  Go to full article
The Washington County home of Asa Fitch Jr., an entomologist in the 1800s, has been proposed for listing on the historic register.  Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fitch_Asa_1809-1879.jpg">unknown</a>, public domain
The Washington County home of Asa Fitch Jr., an entomologist in the 1800s, has been proposed for listing on the historic register. Photo: unknown, public domain

Five North Country properties proposed for historic recognition

A state board is recommending that 21 new properties across New York be added to the register of state and national historic places.

The designation is designed to help preserve historic sites, many of them held in private hands, through tax credits. Five of the proposed landmarks are here in the North Country.  Go to full article
The Adirondack Scenic Railroad. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/39017545@N02/">Matt Johnson</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
The Adirondack Scenic Railroad. Photo: Matt Johnson, CC some rights reserved

Understanding the Adirondack Scenic Railroad controversy

This week, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at the fierce debate over the future of the 90-mile rail corridor that stretches from Old Forge to Lake Placid. Train boosters hope to see the state of New York invest millions of dollars reviving the entire line into a world-class seasonal tourism railroad, likely operated by the Utica-based non-profit Adirondack Scenic Railroad.

But a growing number of critics, including many local government leaders in the Park, want the state to consider reinventing the corridor as a year-round multi-use "rail-to-trail" destination.

Brian Mann and Martha Foley spoke about where all this goes next.  Go to full article
Adirondack Scenic Railroad train in Old Forge. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/72644361@N06/8183206757/">Brad O'Brien</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Adirondack Scenic Railroad train in Old Forge. Photo: Brad O'Brien, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

As rail debate simmers, big questions for Scenic Railroad

For more than twenty years, the Adirondack Scenic Railroad has struggled to create an excursion train from Utica to Lake Placid, an attraction that advocates hope will one day serve as a major draw for tourists, carrying passengers through some of the most rugged and scenic terrain in the East. "We view an asset like that as something you would never want to rip up," Bill Branson, the ASR board president, said in an interview last year.

But a nearly month-long investigation by the North Country Public Radio and the Adirondack Explorer has revealed stark and long-lingering questions about the non-profit railroad's financial stability, its professional staff, and its ability to scale up what remains a largely shoestring operation that still carries passengers over only short stretches of the historic corridor.  Go to full article
A rail-trail bridge on the Katy Trail sy stem in Missouri.  Photo:  <a href-"http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Katy_Trail_bridge_and_bikers.jpg">Kbh3rd</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A rail-trail bridge on the Katy Trail sy stem in Missouri. Photo: Kbh3rd, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Adirondack Rail Trail plan leans on state agencies

This is the second part of a two-part series on the Adirondack Rail Trail. Hear the first part here.

State officials say they'll decide soon what to do with the controversial rail corridor that stretches from Old Forge to Lake Placid.

For more than two years, a growing group of activists and local government leaders in the Adirondacks have urged the Cuomo administration to end decades of financial support for the Adirondack Scenic Railroad.

The group called Adirondack Recreation Trail Advocates, also known as "ARTA," hopes to see the ninety-mile corridor converted into a year-round multi-use trail. They say a Rail Trail would provide a bigger tourism draw and could be built quickly with little additional financial support from taxpayers.

But a detailed review by North Country Public Radio in partnership with Adirondack Explorer magazine found that big questions remain about how the trail would be paid for and who would operate it.  Go to full article
Public hearings on the future of the rail corridor were held last fall.  What comes next and when?  No one's certain. Photo: Brian Mann
Public hearings on the future of the rail corridor were held last fall. What comes next and when? No one's certain. Photo: Brian Mann

Adirondack rails-trails debate still stuck "in limbo"

Eight months have passed since New York state officials announced that they were opening a review of the future use of the historic rail corridor between Old Forge and Lake Placid. The move followed growing pressure from local government leaders and activists critical of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad, which now operates seasonal excursion trains on sections of the line.

Supporters see the railroad as a potential tourism attraction that could draw visitors from all over the world. Critics say the project has been a boondoggle and should be replaced by a multi-purpose trail. The debate has sharply divided communities and interest groups in the park.  Go to full article
A train of oil tankers. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11072040@N08/6184231577/">Russ Allison Loar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A train of oil tankers. Photo: Russ Allison Loar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Local officials want more answers about rail-oil safety

At a meeting this week in Elizabethtown, in Essex County, Canadian Pacific refused to disclose its emergency response plan in case of a major rail tanker disaster on its line in the Champlain Valley.

According to the Plattsburgh Press-Republican, CP spokesman Randy Marsh cited security concerns in declining to tell local government leaders and first responders about the company's response plan.  Go to full article
Corrections officers from the North Country rallied in Albany on Tuesday, protesting closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility Photo:  Gary Carlsen, NYSCOPBA, used with permission
Corrections officers from the North Country rallied in Albany on Tuesday, protesting closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility Photo: Gary Carlsen, NYSCOPBA, used with permission

Guards rally in Albany to block NY prison closures

Hundreds of prison guards, many from the North Country, rallied yesterday outside the Capitol in Albany, demanding that Gov. Andrew Cuomo cancel a plan to mothball four state prisons in July.

The closure list includes two state prisons in the North Country, Chateaugay Correctional Facility in northern Franklin County, and Mt. McGregor in Saratoga County.  Go to full article
Snowmobile Crossing. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/amsd2dth/3413819666">amsd2dsh</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Snowmobile Crossing. Photo: amsd2dsh, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

A tough winter, even for snowmobile clubs

It's been a tough winter, with lots of cold weather in the North Country but not much snow, especially in January and February. That makes for a very tough season for businesses in the region that rely on winter sports, especially snowmobiling.

Dom Jacangelo, head of the New York State Snowmobile Association, was in the Adirondacks over the weekend. He says that trail conditions have been poor for many sledding clubs.  Go to full article
Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. NCPR file Photo: Brian Mann
Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. NCPR file Photo: Brian Mann

Rally to save prisons today in Albany

A rally is planned for later this morning in Albany to protest the planned closure of four state prisons across New York, including Chateaugay and Mt. McGregor here in the North Country.

Local leaders face tough choices in the weeks ahead. They're still fighting to save local prisons, and the jobs and economic funds that come with correctional facilities.

But they're also hoping to work with the Cuomo administration to win millions of dollars in redevelopment funds.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   11-20 of 2865 stories   next 10 »   last »


Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

AP
January 2, 2014 | NPR · Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
October 29, 2013 | NCPR · With just a hundred days to go before the Winter Olympic Games open in Russia, even many gold medalists are still fighting for a place on Team USA. Justin Olsen, a bobsledder from San Antonio, Texas, helped the U.S. win a historic gold medal four years ago in Vancouver, but he's struggled to overcome injuries in the lead-up to Sochi.
 
September 10, 2013 | NPR · New York adopted one of the toughest gun control laws in the U.S. — banning the sale of assault rifles and banana clips. Many of the state's county sheriffs hate the law and some say they won't enforce it. The fight over gun rights and gun safety has become a hot issue in sheriff races, as local law enforcement officials seek re-election in rural counties.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
Reuters /Landov
July 11, 2013 | NPR · Twenty bodies have been recovered so far. Authorities hold out little hope that any of the 30 other people missing after Saturday's train derailments and explosions are still alive.
 
July 11, 2013 | NPR · In Lac Megantic, Quebec, locals are waiting impatiently for answers following Saturday's train explosion that left 50 people dead. The provincial government in Quebec is blasting the railroad at the center of this disaster for responding too slowly — and requesting more aid from Canada's federal government to help the rural town rebuild.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.
 
istockphoto.com
April 30, 2012 | NPR · The Obama administration backed off a proposal to restrict kids under 16 from working on farms after a major push by conservatives and farm state Democrats. But farmers themselves weren't too happy about the restrictions, either.
 
February 18, 2012 | NPR · U.S. bobsled racers triumphed at the 2010 Winter Olympics, but it's been tough sledding ever since. The American team has lost big sponsors and struggled to win big races. This weekend, the world's top sled teams face off in Lake Placid, N.Y., for the world championships. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports that American athletes hope the home-track advantage will give them a shot at a medal.