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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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Taxco's Templo de Santa Prisca
Taxco's Templo de Santa Prisca

Audio Postcard: Christmas Eve in Taxco, Mexico

Last Christmas eve, Brian Mann found himself in the highland town of Taxco, in central Mexico. The city is famous for its hilltop architecture and its fantastic baroque cathedral, built in the 1700s. Brian went out with his microphone to gather sounds of the holiday season and brought back this audio postcard.  Go to full article
Arto Monaco at work on a new comic book
Arto Monaco at work on a new comic book

Arto Monaco: The King of Make Believe

Walt Disney opened his first theme park in the summer of 1955. But half a decade before Disneyland, there was Santa's Workshop in Wilmington ? the creation of north country native Arto Monaco. Monaco built a half-dozen theme parks. Most are gone now, swept away by changing tastes. But Monaco himself is still around, still creating make-believe worlds. Brian Mann visited his workshop in Upper Jay and has our story.  Go to full article

Lending a Helping Hand to Fort Drum Families

Brian Mann has a round-table discussion with the Army Community Services staff at Fort Drum, about their effort to help military
families in financial trouble.  Go to full article

At Fort Drum, A War On Poverty

Soldiers at Fort Drum, near Watertown, are preparing for possible war in Iraq. But the Army is also struggling with a more domestic issue. By the Pentagon's own estimate, thousands of military families across the country live in poverty. Despite recent salary increases, some enlisted men and women say they can't afford food and other basic needs. Brian Mann visited Fort Drum and sends this report.  Go to full article

Hikers Found Safe On Algonquin

Three Canadian hikers were rescued Tuesday morning on Algonquin Peak, after spending a night on the mountain. Forest rangers found the men with the help of a state police helicopter. As Brian Mann reports, the hikers and the rescue team faced extreme cold.  Go to full article

Audio Postcard: An Invasive Species in Lake George's Most Popular Bays

A political fight is underway over the use of a chemical herbicide in Lake George. For years, local residents have watched with alarm as an invasive plant species called Eurasian watermilfoil spread into bays and coves, choking out native plants. The issue is now the subject of intense lobbying in Albany. In the summer of 2001, Brian Mann traveled to Lake George to see the problem first hand. He sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Audio Postcard From Lake George, Where An Invasive Species Has Taken Root

The political debate is raging over the use of a chemical herbicide to slow the spread of an invasive plant on Lake George. Brian Mann revisits a summer trip on the lake, made with the Lake George Park Commission's Mike White in 2001.

Note: Story updated for broadcast.  Go to full article

Lake George: Bitter Debate Over Plan To Use Chemical

The Adirondack Park Agency has delayed a final vote on the use of a chemical herbicide in Lake George. Many locals hope the chemical "Sonar" will kill an invasive plant species called Eurasian watermilfoil. But Park Agency staff oppose the plan. As Brian Mann reports, the debate has turned ugly, with Lake George residents promising to lobby Governor Pataki.

Tuesday during regional news, we'll take the sonar question out onto the waters of Lake George, revisiting a summer trip to a bay that's infested with Eurasian watermilfoil.  Go to full article

APA Considers Banning Floatplanes on Lowes Lake

The Adirondack Park Agency moved a step closer on Thursday to banning floatplanes on Lowes Lake. At the meeting yesterday, the Department of Environmental Conservation presented its plan for the Bog River management area, southwest of Tupper Lake.  Go to full article
Broken phones on I-87<br />Photo provided by APA
Broken phones on I-87
Photo provided by APA

Coming Soon: Emergency & Cell Phone Service on Northway

At its meeting today in Ray Brook, the Adirondack Park Agency is expected to approve a new emergency phone system on I-87. The old network hasn't functioned properly for years. As Brian Mann reports, the upgraded system will also mean better cell phone coverage in the remote area between Schroon Lake and Peru.  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

August 14, 2014 | NPR · Funeral services were held Thursday for Kevin Ward Jr., the driver killed on the track after being hit by former NASCAR champion Tony Stewart. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann attended the service; he speaks with Robert Siegel about the funeral and possible investigations into the incident.
 
July 24, 2014 | NCPR · Small-town startups often struggle to attract serious investors. But efforts are under way to help entrepreneurs outside the urban beltway find financing.
 
AP
January 2, 2014 | NPR · Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
NCPR
August 28, 2013 | NPR · For the last four decades the Rockefeller Drug Laws have been impacting many in upstate New York. North Country Public Radio undertook an ambitious reporting project to tell this national story throughout this year, which marks the 40th anniversary of the Rockefeller Laws.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
Reuters /Landov
July 11, 2013 | NPR · Twenty bodies have been recovered so far. Authorities hold out little hope that any of the 30 other people missing after Saturday's train derailments and explosions are still alive.
 
Getty Images
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · Forty years ago, New York enacted tough laws in response to a wave of drug-related crime. They became known as the Rockefeller drug laws, and they set the standard for states looking to get tough on crime. But a new debate is under way over the effectiveness of such strict sentencing laws.
 
Courtesy of Yvonne Prendes
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · George Prendes was 23 when he was sentenced under New York's Rockefeller drug laws — tough mandatory sentencing guidelines for nonviolent drug crimes. The 15 years Prendes served for a drug transaction still reverberate for him and his family.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.