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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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 A discussion group at the Wildlands Exchange Conference.
A discussion group at the Wildlands Exchange Conference.

Canada's Parks: A More Restrictive Model for the Adirondacks?

This summer, visitors to the High Peaks found more rules and regulations than ever before. The new unit management plan bans campfires and limits the size of hiking groups. But compared with parks in Canada, the Adirondacks are still wide open.
At a conference this weekend, recreation users and pro-environment groups debated a future where that could change, with access to the backcountry limited by quotas and permits. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

113th Assembly District Debate: Jobs & Politics

Assembly candidates in the 113th district gathered last night for a debate in Lake Placid. The talk was mostly about jobs and strategies to revive the struggling North Country economy. This race promises to be one of the most competitive in the region - with three strong candidates on the November ballot. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Lake Placid: Sewer Woes Delay Development Projects

The village of Lake Placid is scrambling to raise ten million dollars needed to rebuild the sewage treatment plant. Local officials have already doubled water rates - a move that angered many hotel owners. Mayor Robi Politi now says major new development projects - and tourism events - will have to wait until the new plant comes on-line. As Brian Mann reports, some business leaders worry that the sewage bottleneck will derail Lake Placid's prosperity.  Go to full article
Stewart Belkin, President of Newstech NY, Inc., stands outside the mill in Newton Falls.
Stewart Belkin, President of Newstech NY, Inc., stands outside the mill in Newton Falls.

Newton Falls Paper Mill Reopens: Economic Victory For St. Lawrence County

A Canadian company will spend more than twenty million dollars refurbishing the paper mill in Newton Falls. The plan--which will mean roughly 120 job--was unveiled Sunday at a ceremony in the village. The economy in southern St. Lawrence County was devastated three years ago when the Newton Falls mill shut down. As Brian Mann reports, many locals say yesterday's announcement was the pay-off for years of hope and hard work.  Go to full article

Bombardier Announces Layoffs

Transportation giant Bombardier announced today that the company will lay off six percent of its workforce. The move is a blow to the economy in Quebec, where more than a thousand jobs will go. Brian Mann reports it appears that the decision will affect plants in Vermont, but not in New York.  Go to full article

Keeseville: Tanker Crash Threatens Water Supply

A tanker truck crash early Wednesday on the Northway is threatening Keeseville's water supply. Between four and five thousand gallons of transformer oil spilled into a creek that feeds the village's main reservoir. Brian Mann has details:  Go to full article
The Sacandaga River Community Park
The Sacandaga River Community Park

Audio Postcard from the Sacandaga River

It's possible to grow up--and grow old--in a North Country town, never quite noticing its treasures. Paul Wilbur was raised in Speculator, in the woods and bogs along the Sacandaga River. At the age of seventy, he volunteered to lead construction of a community park and a nature trail. The project reconnected him with his community and with his own history. Brian Mann spent a morning with Paul Wilbur and sends this audio postcard.

Directions to the Sacandaga River Community Park: Take Rt. 30 to the four corners in Speculator. South of the intersection, look for the Lemon Tree restaraunt. Across the road, you'll see the community recreation area and the park entrance.  Go to full article
Researcher Eric Britzky marks an Indiana bat roost tree.
Researcher Eric Britzky marks an Indiana bat roost tree.

Champlain Valley: Endangered Bats Colonize Private Land

Scientists in New York and Vermont say 5,000 endangered Indiana bats have colonized the Champlain Valley. The discovery confirmed this summer is good news for a species that's dying off in other parts of the country. But as Brian Mann reports, the bats are roosting on private land. That means new challenges for landowners and for researchers who hope to protect the species.  Go to full article

Adirondack Climate Change Called "Reality"

This week, scientists, government and business leaders, and pro-environment groups are meeting in Raquette Lake. They're talking about global warming caused by human pollution and the impact on our region. The latest research suggests that the north country's climate has already begun to shift. Temperatures are rising subtly. Other human impacts--like acid rain and the spread of invasive species--may be accelerating the pace of change. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Scozzafava To Run As "Conservative"

A candidate who lost last week's GOP primary in the 113th Assembly district says he'll campaign hard in the general election. Thomas Scozzafava announced yesterday that he'll run on the Conservative Party line against Republican Teresa Sayward. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

July 6, 2014 | NCPR · Thousands of locals gathered early Sunday morning in Lac-Megantic to mark one year since a deadly train explosion in the small Eastern Canadian city killed 47 people.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
NCPR
August 28, 2013 | NPR · For the last four decades the Rockefeller Drug Laws have been impacting many in upstate New York. North Country Public Radio undertook an ambitious reporting project to tell this national story throughout this year, which marks the 40th anniversary of the Rockefeller Laws.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
Reuters /Landov
July 11, 2013 | NPR · Twenty bodies have been recovered so far. Authorities hold out little hope that any of the 30 other people missing after Saturday's train derailments and explosions are still alive.
 
Getty Images
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · Forty years ago, New York enacted tough laws in response to a wave of drug-related crime. They became known as the Rockefeller drug laws, and they set the standard for states looking to get tough on crime. But a new debate is under way over the effectiveness of such strict sentencing laws.
 
Courtesy of Yvonne Prendes
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · George Prendes was 23 when he was sentenced under New York's Rockefeller drug laws — tough mandatory sentencing guidelines for nonviolent drug crimes. The 15 years Prendes served for a drug transaction still reverberate for him and his family.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.
 
August 29, 2012 | NCPR · New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to decide soon whether to allow natural gas companies to use the controversial drilling technique known as hydro-fracking. New Yorkers are sharply divided on the issue. Industry groups and activists are campaigning hard to shape how the decision will be received.
 
May 28, 2012 | NCPR · Farm worker advocates and top Obama administration officials have been pushing hard for new regulations that would improve safety for teenagers working on farms. But facing fierce opposition from the agriculture industry and its allies in Congress, the Department of Labor abruptly withdrew a set of rules that advocates said could save dozens of lives every year.