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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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Adirondack Hunting Camps: Traditional Use or Backcountry Condos?

For more than a century, hunters and fishermen in the Adirondacks have leased land for their cabins from big logging companies. But changes in the timber industry - and conservation deals made with the state - are displacing hundreds of hunting clubs. Now, more sportsmen are looking to buy their land, hoping to keep the tradition alive. As Brian Mann reports, the shift is raising new concerns about development in the backcountry.  Go to full article

Ortloff Withdraws: Senate Race Loses Drama, Democracy

The race to replace Senator Ron Stafford lost half its steam last night. Just before a meeting of the Clinton County Republican Party, Assemblyman Chris Ortloff announced that he has withdrawn his candidacy. As Brian Mann reports, Ortloff is stepping aside after GOP officials across the north country threw their weight behind his opponent.  Go to full article

Bush Administration Relaxes Clean Air Act Rules: Raises Acid Rain Fears

New York's Attorney General says he'll sue to block a Whitehouse plan that could mean more acid rain for the Adirondacks. New rules announced Thursday would ease rules for coal burning big power plants in the Midwest. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Jetski Bans Spread: Five Adirondack Towns Now Restrict Personal Watercraft

This week, the towns of North Elba and Chester moved to tighten restrictions on jetskis. Personal watercraft will be banned completely from Lake Placid. On Loon Lake, jetski-riders will face new age and speed limits. As Brian Mann reports, some locals, and some government officials, say the controls are unfair.  Go to full article

Plattsburgh's Mayor Won't Run for Stafford's Senate Seat

Plattsburgh Mayor Dan Stewart announced on Monday that he won't make a bid to replace Senator Ron Stafford. Stewart, a Republican, would have faced Assemblyman Chris Ortloff and Assemblywoman Betty Little in the GOP primary. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

More on the Lake Placid Film Forum

Martha Foley talks with Brian Mann about the latest gathering of film stars, directors, producers and writers in Lake Placid.  Go to full article

A Filmmaker's Take On September 11th: Letting People Speak for Themselves

The third annual Lake Placid Film Forum closed Sunday evening. The festival's top award went to a Canadian film called Fast Runner, an epic about an Inuit family in the arctic. The top documentary prize went to Photos to Send, a look at the work of photographer Dorothea Lange. Winning the Festival's special Honorable Mention category was a movie that's not quite a movie. September 11: Response is described by its creators as a visual archive of what New Yorkers experienced on that day. Brian Mann's story about the work includes strong and graphic language.  Go to full article

Recommendation To Bishop: Close Tupper Lake's Catholic Elementary School

Parents and faculty at the Holy Ghost Academy in Tupper Lake are recommending that the 99-year-old elementary school close for good at the end of this academic year. The decision follows a decline in enrollment. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

In Canada, A Church Sex Abuse Scandal Touches Thousands of Natives and Lawsuits Threaten Religious Groups With Bankruptcy

While the Roman Catholic church in the United States wrestles with its sex-abuse scandal, churches in Canada face a crisis of their own. For more than a century, Canada's government forced native children into boarding schools - schools run by the country's leading churches. Now, thousands of former students claim they were raped and beaten, by priests and other school officials. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent, to settle victim claims and to rebuild native communities. But as North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports, the crush of lawsuits is forcing Canadian religious groups into bankruptcy.  Go to full article

The Stafford Vacuum

Martha Foley talks with Brian Mann about the latest maneuverings in the political vacuum left behind in northeastern New York by State Senator Ron Stafford's retirement.  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

AP
January 2, 2014 | NPR · Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
October 29, 2013 | NCPR · With just a hundred days to go before the Winter Olympic Games open in Russia, even many gold medalists are still fighting for a place on Team USA. Justin Olsen, a bobsledder from San Antonio, Texas, helped the U.S. win a historic gold medal four years ago in Vancouver, but he's struggled to overcome injuries in the lead-up to Sochi.
 
September 10, 2013 | NPR · New York adopted one of the toughest gun control laws in the U.S. — banning the sale of assault rifles and banana clips. Many of the state's county sheriffs hate the law and some say they won't enforce it. The fight over gun rights and gun safety has become a hot issue in sheriff races, as local law enforcement officials seek re-election in rural counties.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
July 11, 2013 | NPR · In Lac Megantic, Quebec, locals are waiting impatiently for answers following Saturday's train explosion that left 50 people dead. The provincial government in Quebec is blasting the railroad at the center of this disaster for responding too slowly — and requesting more aid from Canada's federal government to help the rural town rebuild.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.
 
istockphoto.com
April 30, 2012 | NPR · The Obama administration backed off a proposal to restrict kids under 16 from working on farms after a major push by conservatives and farm state Democrats. But farmers themselves weren't too happy about the restrictions, either.
 
February 18, 2012 | NPR · U.S. bobsled racers triumphed at the 2010 Winter Olympics, but it's been tough sledding ever since. The American team has lost big sponsors and struggled to win big races. This weekend, the world's top sled teams face off in Lake Placid, N.Y., for the world championships. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports that American athletes hope the home-track advantage will give them a shot at a medal.
 
September 4, 2011 | NPR · The massive clean-up from Tropical Storm Irene continues in upstate New York, but some cash-strapped rural communities say they're not sure how much they can afford to rebuild.