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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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AT&T Tests Adirondack Cell Tower Policy

The Adirondack Park Agency is reviewing an application by AT&T wireless that could improve cell phone service along a stretch of the Northway. The antenna project is a first test of the agency's new tower policy, designed to protect the region's views. Brian Mann was at yesterday's APA meeting and has this report.  Go to full article

Wildlife Corridor Would Strengthen Parks; Study Says Locals Would Fight Project

Students at Clarkson University presented a new report yesterday on a proposed wildlife corridor that would link the Adirondack Park and Ontario's Algonquin Provincial Park. The study found that the corridor would help animals making the trip between the two parks. But the report also says the idea will draw fierce resistance from private landowners. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

The US and Canadian Amputee Hockey Teams to play Exhibition Game at the Winter Paralympics on Saturday.

The US and Canadian National Amputee Hockey teams to play exhibition game at the Winter Paralympics on March 16th. Last year, the first US and Canadian Amputee Hockey Game was played at the Civic Center in Saranac Lake. Brian Mann was there and filed this report from February, 2001  Go to full article

Labor Numbers: State Workers Hurting From Recession and September 11th Aftermath

New York's Labor Department has released its latest employment numbers and the jobs picture looks bleak for much of the state. Hit by the September 11th terrorist attack and by a global recession, the state lost more than 140,000 jobs last year. As Brian Mann reports, parts of the north country are feeling the squeeze - but others held steady.
 Go to full article

North Country Olympians Return Home Triumphant, Eager for Return To Small Town Life

The North Country's Olympic athletes were welcomed home from Salt Lake City on Saturday with a parade in Lake Placid. Hundreds of people lined the streets to shake hands and cheer. As Brian Mann reports, it was a chance for locals to share some of the glow of Olympic gold.
 Go to full article

North Country Prison Industry Faces Recession

This year, New York state's prisons cut more than six hundred corrections officers. With inmate populations shrinking, corrections commissioner Glenn Goord says another five hundred prison guards will go this year. As Brian Mann reports, the loss of high paying jobs is being felt in prison towns across the North Country.  Go to full article

Canadian Dies While Ice Climbing in Adirondacks

A 34-year-old Toronto man died Friday afternoon on
Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain in the Adirondack town of Chesterfield. Kevin Bailey fell while ice climbing on the mountain's popular east face. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Lake Placid Photographer Nancy Battaglia in Salt Lake City

During the Salt Lake City Games, we've been checking in with Lake Placid sports photographer Nancy Battaglia. She's had a front row seat throughout the last two weeks. Brian Mann caught up with Nancy last night, in the middle of the US-Canada hockey bout.
 Go to full article

St. Lawrence University Students Test Themselves Against a Mountain

Last month, a group of students from St. Lawrence University traveled to central Mexico. They were hoping to scale Orizaba - the third highest peak in North America. The week-long expedition gave the students a chance to climb into thin air. For many of the students, it was also a first chance to explore a different culture. Brian Mann went along on the trip. He sends this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Lake Placid's Jim Shea, Jr. Wins Olympic Gold

Seventy years after his grandfather won a pair of gold medals at the Lake Placid Winter Games, Jim Shea Jr. claimed his own Olympic gold medal on Wednesday in Salt Lake City. The skeleton sled racer from Lake Placid edged Martin Rettl of Austria by a fraction of a second. Brian Mann has details:  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

AP
January 2, 2014 | NPR · Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
October 29, 2013 | NCPR · With just a hundred days to go before the Winter Olympic Games open in Russia, even many gold medalists are still fighting for a place on Team USA. Justin Olsen, a bobsledder from San Antonio, Texas, helped the U.S. win a historic gold medal four years ago in Vancouver, but he's struggled to overcome injuries in the lead-up to Sochi.
 
September 10, 2013 | NPR · New York adopted one of the toughest gun control laws in the U.S. — banning the sale of assault rifles and banana clips. Many of the state's county sheriffs hate the law and some say they won't enforce it. The fight over gun rights and gun safety has become a hot issue in sheriff races, as local law enforcement officials seek re-election in rural counties.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
July 11, 2013 | NPR · In Lac Megantic, Quebec, locals are waiting impatiently for answers following Saturday's train explosion that left 50 people dead. The provincial government in Quebec is blasting the railroad at the center of this disaster for responding too slowly — and requesting more aid from Canada's federal government to help the rural town rebuild.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.
 
istockphoto.com
April 30, 2012 | NPR · The Obama administration backed off a proposal to restrict kids under 16 from working on farms after a major push by conservatives and farm state Democrats. But farmers themselves weren't too happy about the restrictions, either.
 
February 18, 2012 | NPR · U.S. bobsled racers triumphed at the 2010 Winter Olympics, but it's been tough sledding ever since. The American team has lost big sponsors and struggled to win big races. This weekend, the world's top sled teams face off in Lake Placid, N.Y., for the world championships. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports that American athletes hope the home-track advantage will give them a shot at a medal.
 
September 4, 2011 | NPR · The massive clean-up from Tropical Storm Irene continues in upstate New York, but some cash-strapped rural communities say they're not sure how much they can afford to rebuild.