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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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Plattsburgh Industrial Site Slated for Clean-up

A consultant for the city of Plattsburgh says an old industrial site on the Saranac River is leaking a toxic, tarry sludge. At a press conference yesterday, Dr. Allen Hathaway described the plant as a high priority clean-up. Brian Mann has more.  Go to full article

EPA, GE May Work Together On Hudson Clean-up

After years of bitter fighting, General Electric and the Environmental Protection Agency are moving ahead with plans to dredge the Hudson River. GE is giving signs that it may work with the EPA - instead of filing legal action to block the clean-up. Federal officials are also offering compromise. Brian Mann has this update.  Go to full article

Special Report: Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The US Senate is expected to debate the country's energy plan this week. New York's senators oppose plans to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This special half-hour documentary report on ANWR was produced by Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Baptist Minister Steps Down After Naming "Satanic" Businesses

A Baptist minister in Tupper Lake has resigned after distributing a list of local businesses and organizations that he described as "satanic". The list of names included the public library and the Catholic church. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Trout Season Opener: The Joys of Cold, Frustration

Yesterday was the first day of trout season. It was cold and blustery, but Brian Mann decided to shake out his tackle box and go stand by the Saranac River for a couple of hours. Brian didn't catch any fish, but he tells us it was a great excuse to hang around in bait shops on a Monday afternoon.  Go to full article

Protecting the Adirondacks, Pt 2

The State of New York is pushing hard to finish dozens of unit management plans, the blueprints that govern recreation and environmental protection in the Adirondacks. The process is controversial in the North Country, but it's also drawing attention outside the Park. Brian Mann attended a meeting in Albany soon after the initiative was launched.  Go to full article

Planning In the Adirondack Park: Process Is Slow & Controversial

When the Adirondack Park Agency was created, in the early 1970s, the act called for creation of dozens of unit management plans. The plans were meant to be detailed blueprints, shaping recreation and environmental protection in the Park's state forests. But in the decades since, few of those plans have been created. A $12-million initiative launched two years ago was meant to fill in the blanks. But as Brian Mann reports, there are worries that the planning process is behind schedule and facing some tough debates.  Go to full article

Loon Study

Researchers in the Adirondacks are working to learn more about the common loon. The latest field study is raising questions about mercury contamination in the lakes and ponds where the loons live. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

12 North Country Women Fined in pyramid scheme

Attorney General Eliot Spitzer says 12 North Country women have paid fines ranging from $1,000 to $20,000 dollars for their roles in a pyramid scheme. The investigation into the so-called Women's Gifting Circle began in 2000 after many women complained about losing money in the scheme, which was sold as a way for women to support other women in need. Most of the women are from Saranac Lake and Lake Placid. Brian Mann reports.
 Go to full article

Former North Country Priest Accused of Child Sexual Abuse

A Catholic priest that served in small towns across the North Country has been accused of sexually abusing children. A lawsuit filed by two women in Syracuse hopes to win a damage award of seven million dollars. As Brian Mann reports, the same priest has been accused of sexually abusing girls over a period of twenty-five years—in Canton, Sackets Harbor, and St. Regis Falls.  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

August 14, 2014 | NPR · Funeral services were held Thursday for Kevin Ward Jr., the driver killed on the track after being hit by former NASCAR champion Tony Stewart. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann attended the service; he speaks with Robert Siegel about the funeral and possible investigations into the incident.
 
July 24, 2014 | NCPR · Small-town startups often struggle to attract serious investors. But efforts are under way to help entrepreneurs outside the urban beltway find financing.
 
AP
January 2, 2014 | NPR · Parts of the Northeast and New England are expected to be hit the hardest today and Friday. More than a foot of snow may fall on Boston. The wind chill may plunge to 40 degrees below zero in the Adirondacks. Flight delays and cancellations are piling up along with the snow.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
NCPR
August 28, 2013 | NPR · For the last four decades the Rockefeller Drug Laws have been impacting many in upstate New York. North Country Public Radio undertook an ambitious reporting project to tell this national story throughout this year, which marks the 40th anniversary of the Rockefeller Laws.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
Reuters /Landov
July 11, 2013 | NPR · Twenty bodies have been recovered so far. Authorities hold out little hope that any of the 30 other people missing after Saturday's train derailments and explosions are still alive.
 
Getty Images
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · Forty years ago, New York enacted tough laws in response to a wave of drug-related crime. They became known as the Rockefeller drug laws, and they set the standard for states looking to get tough on crime. But a new debate is under way over the effectiveness of such strict sentencing laws.
 
Courtesy of Yvonne Prendes
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · George Prendes was 23 when he was sentenced under New York's Rockefeller drug laws — tough mandatory sentencing guidelines for nonviolent drug crimes. The 15 years Prendes served for a drug transaction still reverberate for him and his family.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.