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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann
News Reporter and Adirondack Bureau Chief

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Remembering Winter Olympian Jack Shea

Lake Placid's legendary Winter Olympian, Jack Shea, died this week in a car crash near his home. The 91-year-old was the oldest living gold medalist. He was killed just three weeks before his grandson will compete at the Winter Games in Salt Lake City. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann has our remembrance.  Go to full article

Lake Placid Hosts World Mogul and Aerial Jumping Competition

Lake Placid grabbed some of the winter sport spotlight over the weekend. Skiers from around the world competed in the mogul and aerial jumping competitions. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

People: Mike Coffey?On Poetry and Language

Our literacy series continues as poet Michael Coffey reads his poem "Marie" and talks about language. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Confessions of a Library "Criminal"

Brian Mann's commentary on his love of reading and books--and a love-hate relationship with libraries.  Go to full article

Literacy and Illiteracy in the North Country, pt. 2

Looking at the two dominant methods of teaching reading, phonics and whole language, how they work, and how they don't. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Literacy and Illiteracy in the North Country, pt. 1

The first in our series on literacy and illiteracy in the North Country. Today--a look at the latest research into what literacy is. How do people learn to read? Why is it easy for some, but not or others? How does the brain learn and use language? Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Lake Colden Outpost: Building for the Wilderness

When state officials announced that a new cabin was being built on Lake Colden, in the High Peaks, the decision was controversial. That part of the Adirondacks is a designated wilderness area. By law, that means human structures should be kept to a minimum. Supporters of the new cabin argued that it would be a vital tool for rangers and ski patrols who work in the backcountry. That claim was born out this winter. The Lake Colden outpost was used as a base of operations in two successful searches. Brian Mann visited Lake Colden in the fall of 2000, as construction was winding down.  Go to full article

Celebrating the Holidays with Ray Brook Inmates

Doing time is never easy, but the holidays can be especially hard. Last year, Brian Mann visited the state prison at Ray Brook, where inmates with good records enjoyed a rare celebration with their wives and children.  Go to full article

Settlement Clears Way for Lake George Shoreline Development

Developers in Lake George will build fifty-five new timeshare condominiums on the lakeshore. The move follows an out-of-court settlement, reached with the Lake George Association--a non-profit group that had fought to block the plan. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Feeling the Chill: International Students in the North Country, part 2

In the next two weeks, the north country's colleges and universities will empty out as students head home for the winter break. For international students, the holiday offers a rare chance to visit with family in their home countries. But this year, many foreign students are afraid to make the trip. As Brian Mann reports, they fear that US immigration officials won't let them back into the country.  Go to full article

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Brian Mann. Nancie Battaglia photo

Brian Mann
grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer.

Recent Brian Mann stories carried by NPR:

July 24, 2014 | NCPR · Small-town startups often struggle to attract serious investors. But efforts are under way to help entrepreneurs outside the urban beltway find financing.
 
AP
December 16, 2013 | NPR · Forty seven people died in July when a freight train derailed and dozens of tanks carrying oil exploded and caught fire. Much of Lac-Megantic was leveled. For the first time since then, freight cars will travel through this week. Officials say they'll only carry "dry goods." Residents are worried.
 
NCPR
August 28, 2013 | NPR · For the last four decades the Rockefeller Drug Laws have been impacting many in upstate New York. North Country Public Radio undertook an ambitious reporting project to tell this national story throughout this year, which marks the 40th anniversary of the Rockefeller Laws.
 
July 26, 2013 | NPR · More than two weeks after a fiery train crash left 47 dead in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the town's center remains in shambles, while a criminal investigation and lawsuits are underway.
 
Getty Images
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · Forty years ago, New York enacted tough laws in response to a wave of drug-related crime. They became known as the Rockefeller drug laws, and they set the standard for states looking to get tough on crime. But a new debate is under way over the effectiveness of such strict sentencing laws.
 
Courtesy of Yvonne Prendes
February 14, 2013 | NCPR · George Prendes was 23 when he was sentenced under New York's Rockefeller drug laws — tough mandatory sentencing guidelines for nonviolent drug crimes. The 15 years Prendes served for a drug transaction still reverberate for him and his family.
 
November 4, 2012 | NPR · As New York City's first responders begin to show fatigue, and in many cases deal with losses of their own homes, replacement crews of firefighters are getting ready to roll into Manhattan and Long Island. Among them are a group of firefighters from a small rural fire station in the mountains of upstate New York.
 
August 29, 2012 | NCPR · New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is expected to decide soon whether to allow natural gas companies to use the controversial drilling technique known as hydro-fracking. New Yorkers are sharply divided on the issue. Industry groups and activists are campaigning hard to shape how the decision will be received.
 
May 28, 2012 | NCPR · Farm worker advocates and top Obama administration officials have been pushing hard for new regulations that would improve safety for teenagers working on farms. But facing fierce opposition from the agriculture industry and its allies in Congress, the Department of Labor abruptly withdrew a set of rules that advocates said could save dozens of lives every year.
 
istockphoto.com
April 30, 2012 | NPR · The Obama administration backed off a proposal to restrict kids under 16 from working on farms after a major push by conservatives and farm state Democrats. But farmers themselves weren't too happy about the restrictions, either.