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Gardening

The tap...
The tap...

Listen: In Canton, tapping trees for syrup

The immediate forecast isn't ideal for making maple syrup, but it's coming: that combination of cold nights, warm days and sunshine. Chickadees get busy, and the sap rises.

Whether your operation includes a bulk holding tank and miles of plastic tubing, or just a few buckets hanging off the trees in the backyard, it all starts the same way, with a strategically placed hole in a sugar maple.


Today's Heard Up North was first broadcast in March 2010.  Go to full article
Garden crop rotation can maintian soil fertility, reduce disease and increase yields. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/57217144@N00/476016841/">Annie and John</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Why rotate crops in your backyard garden?

Just like big farms, the backyard garden can benefit from rotating vegetable crops. Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulturist Amy Ivy says small-scale crop rotation can minimize pests and disease and increase yields. Todd Moe spoke with Amy about deciding which crops to plant in the vegetable garden from one year to the next. She says a knowledge of vegetables and their botanical families is helpful.  Go to full article
Wait a little longer for the intense cold to pass before pruning. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ndrwfgg/82103133/">Andrew Fogg</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening: Is it too soon to prune?

Martha Foley and Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturalist Amy Ivy talk about what it is, and isn't, safe to do in your garden this early in a very chilly year, and how to simulate spring indoors.  Go to full article
Food from the Farm: Eating Local in the North Country takes place Saturday, March 1, 2-5 pm in the Plattsburgh City Gym. Photo: Cornell Cooperative Extension

Plattsburgh event showcases local food, even in the dead of winter

Most gardens are a long way from yielding those delicious spring and summer veggies, but you could still make a meal of the food on offer from professional growers, livestock...  Go to full article
If you could actually see the little suckers, this is what a fungus gnat would look like. You're welcome. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trauerfliege.JPG">Peter Ruhr</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Those annoying little bugs aren't fruitflies, they're fungus gnats. Here's how to get rid of them.

The little things flying randomly around your office? They're most likely fungus gnats, an annoying pest that lives in the soil of potted plants. They eat fungus in the soil,...  Go to full article
Martha Foley's perennials. Photo: Martha Foley

How to build a perennial garden

The catalog pages picturing masses of colorful perennial flowers can be exciting. But creating your own flower beds can be a daunting prospect. Cooperative Extension...  Go to full article
"Day-Neutral" strawberries give a longer harvest season. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035796924@N01/3654599083/">Wayne Surber</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thinking ahead for strawberries

Strawberries are a good fruit crop for home gardeners to try, and now's the time to be thinking ahead and placing an order for young plants.

According to...  Go to full article
Illustration from a 1904 Burpee seed catalog. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/burpee/167767777/">Burpee Gardens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Tips for handling garden catalog-induced tempations

For most backyard gardeners it's still too early for serious seed shopping. But it doesn't hurt to look and plan. Just like weeds, those garden catalogs seem to multiply in...  Go to full article
Home heating systems can make it hard to provide humidity for houseplants in winter. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/spaceamoeba/4171028387/">spaceamoeba</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Keeping houseplants healthy in harsh winter conditions

With the bitter cold outside, the heat will be turned up inside the house. That means dryer air will be rising right towards the houseplants on the windowsill. It's tough...  Go to full article
Potatoes rising. Photo: Ellen Rocco

Planning for potatoes

It isn't the growing season yet in the North Country, not by a long shot, but it is planning time. Catalogs for seeds, gardening supplies and gadgets are the first signs of...  Go to full article

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