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Considering 'Sesame Street'

Nov 5, 2009

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Sarah Handel

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In case you've missed it so far, Sesame Street is about to start its 40th season. I've loved the Google doodles (yesterday's featured Big Bird — specifically, his legs — and today belongs to Cookie Monster, whose googly (conicidence?!) eyes make up the O's), and can rarely resist the urge to search for old clips online (Ladybug picnic anyone? How about milk? Rrradio, rradio!). So I'm enjoying the variety of takes on this anniversary around the web. Here are some good ones.

Keith Stills, writing for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's MOMania blog asks, 40 years on, do kids still love Sesame Street?

All of my kids enjoyed Sesame Street for a while. But with so many children's programs on so many different channels, Sesame Street faced stiff competition and was never really the favorite.

Troy Patterson from Slate blames Cookie Monster for our national obsession with TV:

He is brought to you by the insatiability of every child. Sesame Street taught us how to watch television, and Cookie Monster taught us how to want it.

Jimmy Orr at The Vote Blog digs into the "Oscar the Grouch is a communist" brou-ha-ha that took over the blogosphere for a minute. He did some research on Oscar's political persuasion:

All that we could come up with is that he's kind of a cross between Bill O'Reilly and Keith Olbermann. His personality is more like O'Reilly. Yet he's green. So that would make him Olbermann-like.

As for his appearance, Wolf Blitzer probably comes the closest. Not that Blitzer looks like he lives in a garbage can or anything but there aren't many TV commentators with facial hair.

...And in case all this has you nostalgic for your favorite clips, Andrew Heining at the Christian Science Monitor's got you covered.

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