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Breaking Down The House Vote On 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Repeal

May 28, 2010

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In the wake of yesterday's House vote — 234 to 194 — to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that bars gays and bisexuals from serving openly in the military* — one thing stood out the most:

Rep. Mark Critz, the Pennsylvania Democrat who won last week's special election to succeed the late John Murtha (D), a victory heralded by Democrats everywhere, voted to continue the ban.

Rep. Charles Djou, the Hawaii Republican who won Saturday's special election to succeed gov candidate Neil Abercrombie (D), a victory heralded by Republicans everywhere, voted to repeal the ban.

Five Republicans, along with 229 Democrats, voted in favor of repealing the ban.  The five Republicans:  Judy Biggert (Ill.), Joseph Cao (La.), Charles Djou (Haw.), Ron Paul (Tex.) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.).

Opposing the repeal were 26 Democrats, along with 168 Republicans.  The 26 Dems:  Marion Berry (Ark.), Sanford Bishop (Ga.), Rick Boucher (Va.), Bobby Bright (Ala.), Chris Carney (Pa.), Travis Childers (Miss.), Jerry Costello (Ill.), Mark Critz (Pa.), Lincoln Davis (Tenn.), Joe Donnelly (Ind.), Chet Edwards (Tex.), Bob Etheridge (N.C.), Gene Green (Tex.), Daniel Lipinski (Ill.), Jim Marshall (Ga.), Mike McIntyre (N.C.), Solomon Ortiz (Tex.), Colin Peterson (Minn.), Earl Pomeroy (N.D.), Nick Rahall (W.Va.), Mike Ross (Ark.), Heath Shuler (N.C.), Ike Skelton (Mo.), John Spratt (S.C.), John Tanner (Tenn.) and Gene Taylor (Miss.).

*Officially, the House vote enabled a repeal of "don't ask, don't tell" 60 days after the military, in a report due by Dec. 1, decided it would not be disruptive.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET: And if you want to see how all the representatives voted, here's a link to the official roll call.

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