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Princess Di, Reincarnated In Jam

by John Asante
Jul 6, 2010

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I was pretty young when Princess Diana of Wales met her untimely death in late August of 1997. But if there's one thing I still remember about her, it was the hair. Her coif just seemed so elegant — always shoulder length (from what I can recall), feathered, and just the right amount of blonde. And now, I can enjoy her hair at any time of the day — in the form of a spread.

Sam Bompas, founder of Bompas and Parr, a catering company in the UK and maker of the Princess Di jam, reminded me of a stalkerish uber fan (like Jason Schwartzmann's creepy character in the movie Slackers — the one who collected the locks of his love interest to form a hair doll). But this is a legit project, says the Associated Press:

" ... the preserve is made by infusing a tiny speck of the late princess of Wales' hair with gin, which is then combined with milk and sugar to create a product with a taste resembling condensed milk.

The hair was bought on eBay for $10 from a U.S. dealer who collects what he says is celebrity hair and sells it in extremely tiny parts.

The art show's organizers asked his company to come up with a response in food to the exhibition's surrealist theme. Bompas said he decided to make the bizarre product to provoke people into thinking about food marketing and how language enhances the everyday eating experience ... "

The jam is now apart of an art show at London's Barbican Art Gallery. And Bompas' company is selling the product by the jar — a 5 pound jar.

I wonder what the next celebrity body part-pasted concoction will be. (This is usually the point where I come up with some suggestions. But, uh, I'll pass on this. There are tons of food architects out there combining the most unlikely of things). In the meantime, salmon-flavored vodka anyone?

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