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The Hillary-Clinton-For-VP Rumor That Won't Die

Oct 6, 2010

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If you thought the 2008 campaign was over, think again.

Ever since it became apparent that she had lost the Democratic Party's presidential nomination to her rival senator from Illinois, Hillary Clinton has been mentioned as a potential vice presidential choice.

Even now, two years into the tenure of Vice President Joe Biden, she's apparently still being mentioned as a vice presidential pick for President Barack Obama, this time for his 2012 re-election.

Bob Woodward, promoting his new book "Obama's Wars" has revived the rumor, which has really never gone away, that Clinton could be chosen to replace Biden on the 2012 presidential ticket with the vice president presumably getting the State Department spot.

She would excite the president's Democratic base, especially women, the thinking apparently goes. Of course, what goes unmentioned is she would likely excite the opposition, too, becoming a recruiting boon for the Tea Party movement.

The White House has denied that there's anything to this.

Anne Kornblut of the the Washington Post reports:

"There's absolutely nothing to it," senior adviser David Axelrod said Tuesday night. "The president is blessed to have a spectacular vice president and an outstanding secretary of state. They're both doing great work, and he wants to keep them on the job."

Advisers to Clinton said the same, and another Obama adviser called the idea "nuts."

Kornblut goes on to report on the particular life cycle of this rumor, saying it had died down obviously after Obama made his pick in the summer of 2008 but reappeared this summer when Obama's approval ratings tanked.

Maybe to be vice president means to constantly have rumors swirl about you being swapped out.

During the last administration, there were rumors about President George Bush replacing Vice President Dick Cheney. One rumor even had Rudy Giuliani replacing Cheney. We all know how that worked out.

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