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Obama Disapproved By Most Florida Voters

Nov 2, 2010

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Some interesting Pew Research exit poll results out of Florida. Michael Dimcock, associate director, provides the following sketch of what the data show:

FLORIDA SENATE:

Three-way race splits the Democratic vote (53% Meeks, 39% Crist), while Republicans are unified (85% Rubio)And as with the rest of the nation, independents break Republican

IND VOTE: 48% Rubio, 37% Crist, 12% Meek

Same story in terms of Obama:

46% of Floridians approve of Obama, but split vote evenly (48% Meek, 44% Crist)

52% of Floridians disapprove of Obama, and eight-in-ten (79%) back Rubio

Rubio wins both white and Latino vote (54% of whites, 52% of Latinos)

Black voters stick with Meek (78%)

FLORIDA GOVERNOR:

Very close race, unlike rest of the nation, where older voters are breaking heavily Republican, the older voter is split evenly here.

Sink (D) wins youth vote, but just 8% of voters right now. All older age groups divided evenly.

Latino vote is split evenly (50% Sink, 48% Scott) - as in rest of nation, whites are heavily Republican.

Independents breaking GOP (+9 Rep), but by a narrower margin than in the national House vote (+15 Rep).

68% of Floridians say the economy is the #1 issue, and are divided evenly between Sink and Scott.

Nationwide, economic vote favors Republicans. Charlie Crist voters are voting Democratic by three-to-one (75% Sink, 21% Scott)

Look at how much disapproval of Obama drove the Rubio vote. Eight in 10 of those who disapproved Obama voted for Rubio. It appears that Crist could not get past his literal embrace of Obama when the president visited the state to talk up the economic stimulus.

The split in the older vote in the governor's race is interesting. It's a reminder of how many northern snow birds have settled in Florida, bringing with them their Democratic tendencies.

That so many Charlie Crist voters voted for the Democrat Sink is an indication of how many Crist voters were Democrats. Perhaps they didn't vote for Meek because they didn't see him as a winner.

Also, as a politician Crist had a lot of crossover appeal with his support for abortion rights and environmental protection, stances that won him some Democratic support over the years.

Questions of electability clearly didn't stop more than three quarters of black Floridians from voting for Meek, however. A lot of intriguing dynamics there in the Sunshine State.

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