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Undocumented Harvard Student Eric Balderas (AP)

December 16th show

by Gwen Outen
Dec 16, 2010

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Gwen Outen

Young & Undocumented
Millions of young adults have come to the U.S. with their parents and grown up as illegal immigrants. Many go to high school — and the proms, sporting events and the other activities that go along with high school attendance — and some have even gone on to college. Still, they do not have social security numbers and if discovered, they are are subject to deportation. As they grow older, they are finding creative and increasingly challenging ways of living in the shadows of an America that's embroiled in a debate over immigration. Today, host Neal Conan talks with several young adults about the challenges of life as an illegal immigrant.

Michael Wilbon
After more than thirty years with the Washington Post, Michael Wilbon puts down the pen and picks up the mic full-time for ESPN. The sports writer built a name for himself as a columnist over the past twenty years, drawing attention to stories and issues that reshaped the discussion of sports in America. Like many before him, Wilbon's switch from print to TV illustrates the broader shift in the news and sports media. Neal Conan talks with Wilbon about his time spent at The Post and the next steps in his career.

Working in Prison
Last weekend inmates in seven Georgia prisons coordinated a strike: They weren't going to work until conditions and pay improved. Many people know inmates have jobs, but don't realize the variety of products and services they provide and the byzantine pay system in place for many prison jobs. It's not just license plates anymore: Prisoners operate call centers, build office furniture and mix the paint used on highways. NPR's police and prisons correspondent Laura Sullivan joins host Neal Conan along with Walter McNeil, the Secretary of the Florida Department of Corrections.

Bernie's 8 Hour Speech
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) took the Senate floor at 10:25 last Friday morning and continued to talk for 8-1/2 hours against the president's tax deal. In his opening remarks, he said, "I am simply here today to take as long as I can to explain to the American people the fact that we have got to do a lot better than this agreement provides." Still, yesterday the Senate passed the deal that would extend Bush-era tax cuts for two years and extend unemployment benefits for 13 months. The House is expected to pass that deal today. Host Neal Conan talks with Sen. Sanders about his opposition to the compromise and the experience of holding the floor and talking for for eight hours straight.

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