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Libyans Attacked By Pro-Gadhafi Security Forces

Feb 22, 2011

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NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has arrived at the border between Egypt and Libya and tells Morning Edition people are streaming out of Libya. She's interviewed refugees who say Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is using foreign mercenaries from Algeria, Chad and Sudan to fire on Libyans. As the Wall Street Journal reports, Libyan protesters were hit by airstrikes as they demonstrated in their capital, Tripoli.

The results of the crackdown might not be what Gadhafi was looking for. The Libyan delegation to the United Nations says he's now a war criminal. The New York Times reports the group's deputy is telling Gadhafi to stop killing fellow Libyans and leave power immediately. And the official is demanding that other African nations stop sending mercenaries to his country. The Libyan ambassador to the Arab Union is resigning in protest along with other ambassadors to India and Australia.

Reuters cites Egypt's foreign minister who says runways at Benghazi Airport in eastern Libya are destroyed and planes can't land there to evacuate anyone.

EARTHQUAKE IN NEW ZEALAND KILLS DOZENS

Downtown Christchurch has been evacuated because aftershocks continue to roll through New Zealand's second largest city. The first struck Tuesday afternoon (Monday in the United States) and the Guardian's live blog says at least 65 people died. The iconic Christchurch Cathedral is reportedly wrecked and rescuers fear that tourists inside were killed. Bloomberg quotes New Zealand's prime minister, John Key, who says this may be his country's 'darkest day'.

IF IT'S TUESDAY, SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE IS VOTING

Chicago residents choose a mayor today and former Obama White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel has his fingers crossed. The AP takes a quick look at Rahm's struggle just to get on the ballot to face his five other challengers, while on Weekend All Things Considered, NPR's David Schaper summed up the contest: Emanuel vs. Everybody Else. David says Emanuel hopes to earn more than 50% of votes cast today to avoid a run-off election.

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