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NPR CEO Vivian Schiller's Departure Grabs Headlines, Sparks Debates

Mar 9, 2011

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Reported by

Mark Memmott

The news of NPR CEO Vivian Schiller's departure (much more about that here) is at or near the top of most ways of measuring buzz today.

And here are a few ways of gauging what's being said:

Headlines

Time magazine's Tuned In blog: "Video Takes Down the Radio Exec: NPR CEO Steps Down After Sting."

Slate's David Weigel: "Schillerfreude: NPR Dumps CEO in Wake of Video Sting."

The Show & Tell blog at New York's Daily News: "Embattled NPR Hopes New Blood Will Heal Wounds As CEO Vivian Schiller Resigns."

Analyses

— "Look for Republicans to dig in their heels and insist on NPR defunding, and don't be surprised if some Democrats join them." John Fund in his On The Trail blog for The Wall Street Journal.

— "The resignation of NPR's CEO is a vindication for James O'Keefe's guerilla, campaign-style tactics in the a broader political arena, and a signal to expect much more from the right as well as from ThinkProgress and other liberal groups working on their own video 'stings.' " Politico's Ben Smith.

— "Profoundly unjust. Vivian Schiller resigns as head of NPR http://n.pr/gTJUZp Culture war wins. Party on, culture war." New York University's Jay Rosen, on his Twitter page.

— "The hiring and firing of people in the wake of NPR-gate leaves me skeptical. Was it that they really disagreed and were appalled by Ron Schiller's comments or did they finally learn something from crisis communications: that you need to deal with something swiftly to try to make it go away?" Dana Perino, White House spokesman for President George W. Bush, on National Review's The Corner blog.

Comments posted on The Two-Way

— D. R. (nov2wasagoodday) wrote:

"The video [of former NPR fundraiser Ron Schiller] speaks volumes about NPR and Viv.. It's like everything you ever suspected about the agenda at the station is true.....and then some.

"Why is it the people that scream the loudest about being non-biased are in reality exactly the opposite?"

— Leo Cotnoir (No_Tea) wrote:

"I am truly dismayed that the management of NPR seems to be helping the GOP go about their dirty business. NPR is a vital source of truth in the increasingly right-wing dominated airwaves. It needs better management and the support of Congress."

— D. R. (nov2wasagoodday) wrote:

"Any honest listener to NPR knows that NPR has a clear Democratic Party bias—. And as far as funding goes, I don't blame the Republicans for wanting to chop them off—years of bias have placed them in this position—they don't deserve public money."

— Ziyu Ziyu (ziyu) wrote:

"Why is NPR biased to the left? Because it simply doesn't accept as truth the numerous conspiracy theories that modern conservatives believe in. NPR doesn't show support for discrimination against gay people and muslims. NPR is factual in saying that death panels don't exist. NPR is right to dismiss the conspiracy theories regarding climate change. NPR doesn't agree that Obama is not a US citizen. Being factual has now become liberal because mainstream conservatives have moved into a paranoid reality where facts don't apply in the face of conspiracy theories."

— Benkai Bouey (BEHB) wrote:

"Congratulations NPR for moving forward. It was time to get rid of Ms. Schiller. NPR radio will be better for it. I look forward to the board choosing a more balanced chief. You have won back at least one former listener and supporter.

"To all of you who bash conservatives as ignorant inbreds, you should recognize that you are part of the problem, not the solution, when you can't have an engaged informed conversation without name calling."

Keep the conversation going.

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