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Laurent Gbagbo, after being taken into custody. (The Associated Press)

Ivory Coast's Intransigent Leader Gbagbo Surrenders

Apr 11, 2011

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Reported by

Korva Coleman

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET. Gbagbo Arrest, A Warning To Other Dictators:

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says Gbagbo's arrest should serve as a warning to other dictators. The AP reports:

Clinton said dictators should take notice that they cannot disregard "the voice of their own people in free and fair elections." She said there will be consequences for those who cling to power.

Update at 12:50 p.m. ET. Video Of Gbagbo:

A new report from the Associated Press includes video of Gbagbo, sitting n a hotel room, shortly after his arrest. He can be seen talking and gesturing, and appears unharmed. At another point, he's in a t-shirt and looks to be toweling off some sweat.

Update at 11:00 a.m. ET: NPR's Trina Williams spoke with Youssoufou Bamba, Alassane Ouattara's ambassador to the UN. Bamba says Laurent Gbagbo is alive and well but, citing security reasons, he wouldn't say where he and his wife Simone are being held. Bamba insists the French had nothing to do with Gbagbo's capture, that it was entirely done by Ouattara fighters.

Our original post: NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton tells NPR's Newscasts defiant Ivory Coast leader Laurent Gbagbo has been taken by a combination of French and Ivorian opposition forces in his presidential residency in Ivory Coast. She says when Gbagbo was cornered, he offered no resistance.

The BBC says Gbagbo was 'snatched' from his besieged residence, where he's held off fighters loyal to Alassane Ouattara, the internationally recognized winner of Ivory Coast's presidential elections. The UN and French troops started attacking Gbagbo's compound this weekend after Gbagbo loyalists began firing at the UN building, wounding one peacekeeper, Ouattara's headquarters and civilians, according to the Guardian.

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