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An armed US Predator unmanned drone at the Kandahar military airport in Afghanistan. U.S. officials said that a CIA drone attack killed Atiyah Abd al-Rahman, al-Qaida's second-in-command, in Pakistan last week. In today's first hour, we discuss the current state of the terror organization. (AP)

August 29th: What's On Today's Show

by Gwen Outen
Aug 29, 2011

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Another Setback For Al-Qaida
U.S. officials said last week that a CIA drone strike in Pakistan had killed al-Qaida's new second-in-command, Atiyah al-Rahman. After the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, some argued al-Qaida would soon be degraded to the point of irrelevancy. Yet, attacks connected to the terror organization continue. A radical group with likely connections with al-Qaida claimed responsibility for a suicide car bomb attack at the United Nations headquarters in Nigeria. And a suicide bomber linked with the militant group recently killed over two dozen Iraqis in a mosque in Baghdad. Less than two weeks before the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, guest host Rebecca Roberts talks with terrorism experts Peter Bergen and Omar Ashour about the state of al-Qaida.

Opinion Page

Eyewitness Testimony
A recent decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court will make it easier for defendants to question the credibility of eyewitness testimony in criminal cases. The court's decision was based on evidence that eyewitness testimony — specifically police lineups — is flawed and may have sent hundreds of innocent people to jail. The decision is part of an ongoing debate about the role eyewitness testimony plays in criminal proceedings. Guest host Rebecca Roberts speaks with Brandon Garret, author of Convicting the Innocent, Gary Wells, a psychology professor, and New Jersey Deputy Attorney General Paul Heinzel about the limits of eyewitness testimony, the recent court ruling and how it may change the may many police departments and court systems operate.

What's In Your Emergency Kit?
The east coast earthquake and hurricane Irene prove that natural disasters can strike no matter where you live. Whether it's earthquakes, tornados, floods, mudslides or hurricanes, when disasters come, many experts say it pays to be prepared with a well-stocked emergency kit. The Red Cross has a list of recommended emergency supplies that includes flashlights, batteries, water and canned goods but what do you have in your emergency kit? Guest host Rebecca Roberts talks with callers about the emergency kit essentials and why they think they're necessary.

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