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Will twitter ever become a dinosaur like this? (iStockphoto)

Ew, Mom! Nobody Tweets Anymore!

by Priska Neely
Sep 28, 2011

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As I write, the No.1 thing trending on Twitter is #DearOOMF. In case you're like me and had to look that up, OOMF stands for "One Of My Friends/Followers." People can share a message of love or hate to a follower without mentioning a specific name. (#DearOOMF Can we be more than friends?) It's trending, so it's the thing that people are talking about, the hashtag people are using in their tweets.

In a piece in the New York Times this weekend, Jesse Kornbluth, editor of HeadButler.com, said that trending may be on its way out.

There's nothing trending faster in the whirl of sudden fame and fast fades than the thing itself — the phenomenon of trending. It's the hot new word in the social media universe; in the mouths of marketers and pundits, it almost sounds profound. For a season, anyway. This time next year, I won't be at all surprised to read that trending is "just soooo 2011."

It's hard to think that in just a year or so trending could be so 2000-and-late. I wonder how long Twitter itself will be around.

But this made me think of things that have faded in my time on earth, things that my children — when I have them — won't understand.

Like, car phones. Actually, I kind of just miss using telephones for things in general. Remember when you used to call the weather to find out the forecast for the next day? Remember when you used to call for the movie times (you know, when moviefone was a phone number)? Remember when you used to have a house phone?

It's weird to imagine a day when we harken back to the good old days of Facebook and iPads, but I'm sure that day is coming. Or the day when using an iPhone is as ancient a concept as using a carphone the size of a shoebox.

What fleeting highlights of the 21st century will you miss?

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