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BackTalk: Listeners Weigh In On Ala. Immigration Law, Controversial Artist Kreayshawn

by Amy Ta
Oct 28, 2011

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It's time to lift the curtain on what's happening in the Tell Me More blogosphere.

A few weeks ago, guest host Tony Cox spoke with Lindsey Lyons, the mayor of Albertville, Ala., who defended the state's immigration law, which is considered the toughest in America. Lyons said:

"I tell you why I support it and why I'm grateful right now. We've had nine percent unemployment for a number of months now. We've got close to 4,000 people in Marshall County out of work, and one of our local poultry plants, Wayne Farms, just had a job fair recently. And we had hundreds of Americans apply for these jobs that in the past could not get the jobs because they would hire the illegal workforce."

Wayne Farms contacted the program about those comments, providing a letter they sent to Mayor Lyons. They said they stringently adhere to all local, state and federal regulations surrounding employment eligibility and proof of citizenship. They also said that they were one of the original companies to participate in a federal pilot program using electronic verification to check worker eligibility.

Furthermore, last week, Tell Me More spoke with Brit Kirwan, co-chair of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. He was preparing to meet with NCAA President Mark Emmert and share some recommendations. Here's what he told host Michel Martin about college athletics:

"All of this additional revenue that has been generated over the past several decades hasn't gone back to improve the quality of the academic institutions, or, quite frankly, the lives of the student-athletes. They're still getting the same thing they did several decades ago: a scholarship. Where has this money gone? It has gone to pay coaches' salaries. ... The athletes aren't the beneficiaries of all this money. They, the coaches, are the ones. And the athletic directors and the commissioners are the ones that are making all the money."

On Thursday, the NCAA approved some major changes to its rules. Conferences have the option of letting schools give more money to student-athletes to cover living expenses. There are also multi-year scholarships and tougher academic standards for recruits and teams.

Finally, Tell Me More received an overwhelming number of responses to Wednesday's interview with rapper Kreayshawn, who has a love-hate relationship with hip-hop fans.

On NPR.org, Marzette Henderson said that she's been listening to hip-hop since the beginning of the Beastie Boys and Run DMC days, and she thinks that Kreayshawn captures that same hip-hop spirit with her song "Gucci Gucci." Henderson thanked us for introducing her to the song.

However, a commentator calling himself Fred Nietzsche wrote:

"OMG "Gucci Gucci" is quite possibly the worst hip hop song I have heard in a decade. Its popularity says nothing of the artists talent, it instead is an indictment to the ignorance of the human race."

With Tell Me More, the conversation never ends. To tell us more, you can call our comment line at 202-842-3522, and please remember to leave us your name. You can also find us on Twitter and Facebook.

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