Skip Navigation
NPR News
The Doors, photographed in 1966. (Elektra Records)

The Doors Prove Strange Days Are Still With Us

by NPR Staff
Dec 3, 2011 (All Things Considered)

See this

Founded in Los Angeles in 1960s, The Doors (left to right: drummer John Densmore, keyboard player Ray Mansarek, vocalist Jim Morrison and guitarist Robby Krieger) took their name from Aldous Huxley's 1954 book, The Doors of Perception.

Hear this

This text will be replaced
Launch in player

Share this


To this day, Jim Morrison is one of the most significant frontmen to grace the rock stage. His band, The Doors, was unpredictable, mysterious, thrilling — even frightening.

In his new book,The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years, music writer Greil Marcus explores how the rock group came to define an era yet remain relevant today.

Even after all these years, people are still drawn to the band. It's definitely because of the music, Marcus tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin, and, of course, Morrison himself. Yet what really made the band magnetic, he says, was something deeper.

"There was a sense of dread all through their music," Marcus says. "A sense of running away from anything that smelled of a happy ending, because that was false — they caught that current that everyone felt under their skin."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Read full story transcript

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.