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Lauren Goss of Knoxville, Tennessee, uses a self check-in machine to issue her boarding pass in front of an Independence Air ticketing counter at Dulles International Airport May 2, 2005 in Centreville, Virgina. In our second hour, Marketplace special correspondent David Brancaccio talks about his series, Robots Ate My Job, and how technology is becoming a bigger part of our lives. (Getty Images)

April 4th: What's On Today's Show

by Gwen Outen
Apr 4, 2012

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Gwen Outen

The Political Junkie
Mitt Romney swept three primaries on Tuesday: Washington, D.C., Maryland, and the crucial state of Wisconsin. Wisconsin will be in play in the general election, but the real political fight is taking place at the state level. Governor Scott Walker faces a recall election in June, and a major part of the state senate is being recalled, too. Wisconsin Public Radio's Shawn Johnson joins host Neal Conan and Political Junkie Ken Rudin to explain what's happening in the normally moderate, politically-civil Badger State. Ken and Neal will also recap the week in politics, from President Barack Obama's stinging attack of the Republican budget, to Sarah Palin's new hosting gig on morning tv.

Son Off To War
The role of the United States military is a big topic in American politics and can often be a main talking point for politicians seeking office. But in a recent op-ed in The Los Angeles Times, David Freed writes that "politicians can talk all they want about how gut-wrenching it is for them to write letters of condolences ... but they really have no idea what it's like to have a child or spouse in battle" Freed suggests that the the politicians who vote or make orders to send service members into battle don't understand the full extent of what it means to have a loved one serve. Host Neal Conan speaks with David Freed about this disconnect and what he thinks politicians should understand about having family members in combat.

'Robots Ate My Job'
Marketplace special correspondent David Brancaccio wanted to see if it was possible drive across the country without interacting with a human being — just machines. Along the way, he discovered how technological advances affect the daily lives of Americans. Some people, like blue-collar workers in Indiana, experienced job growth because robots allowed them to do more advanced work. Others weren't so lucky, like grocery store clerks in California, who were replaced by self-checkout machines. Neal Conan talks with Brancaccio about his series, "Robots Ate My Job" and Andrew McAfee of MIT's Center for Digital Business about how technology is changing the future of jobs in America.

Falklands
Thirty years ago Argentina invaded the British-controlled Falkland Islands and began a 74-day occupation. Now, Argentine and British leaders are sparring over the territory. Prime Minister David Cameron has said he remains committed to British sovereignty, but Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner called the U.K.'s stance "absurd." Tuesday, protesters attacked the British Embassy in Buenos Aires, and the most powerful warship in the Royal Navy is en route to the South Atlantic on what a spokesman called a "routine deployment."

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