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Woman Will Officiate Big 12 Football Game For The First Time

Jul 22, 2014 (Morning Edition) — Catherine Conti will be part of the crew when Kansas plays Southeast Missouri State. The officiating supervisor says Conti got the job because she's "darned good."

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Telecommuting Didn't Work Out For One Transplanted Worker

Jul 22, 2014 (Morning Edition) — All summer, we're talking with out-of-work young adults about how they're making ends meet. Chrystina Gastlelum, 32, moved to Maine from New York City and tried to keep doing her job remotely.

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Villagers watch a Red Cross burial team carry out a neighbor who may have died of Ebola in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone. The goal is to prevent transmission of the virus from the body of the deceased. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beat

Jul 22, 2014 (Morning Edition)

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Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola. Jose Rovira (center), a World Health Organization logistics expert, trains residents of Pendembu to bury an Ebola victim without touching the body -- a dramatic change in a place where family and friends traditionally wash and embrace a loved one's body. The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola. To confirm the cause of death, Rovira of the World Health Organization takes a swab from a suspected Ebola victim in Pendembu village. The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body. Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.

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Saidu Kanneh was given a hero's welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

"God has made me as an example to survive and then get in to the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who's about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease - he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.

Kanneh's message is that not every patient dies.

And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.

"There is no cure but that does not mean we can't treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic, a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated - a series of tents set up in a field.

He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: "This is just a virus. It's a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That's the same thing that we are doing here.

"Our job is eliminating distractions for the immune system so it can create the anitbodies [that] cure the patient. So they can walk out."

Treating patients is one element of the response to this outbreak; the other huge challenge is stopping transmission of the virus through contact with vomit, blood, sweat and mucus.

Funerals were initially a major source of transmission. "Relatives sometimes fall, cry on the dead body, wash the body," says Temba Morris, who runs a government health clinic in a remote village of roughly 3,000 people near the epicenter of the Sierra Leone outbreak.

Funerals in Sierra Leone, Morris says, are a very physical expression of mourning. But when someone dies of Ebola, the level of virus in the body is at its peak. The corpse is incredibly contagious.

People have been told not to touch the body of anyone who may have died of Ebola. Changing that custom, Morris says, is very hard. "Especially when a strong relative dies, like a mother, father, a child. Everybody wants to touch, everybody wants to fall on the dead. And maybe roll over it. To maybe express their love for the particular person. So it is yet difficult to accept that one."

Nonetheless, he says, Sierra Leoneans are now accepting that they must stay away from the corpse of an Ebola victim. That change in behavior could go a long way to bringing this outbreak to an end.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Villagers watch a Red Cross burial team carry out a neighbor who may have died of Ebola in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone. The goal is to prevent transmission of the virus from the body of the deceased. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

Rosetta Spacecraft Readies For Rendezvous With Comet

Jul 22, 2014 (Morning Edition) — The Rosetta spacecraft hibernated for 31 months while its orbit took it too far away from the sun for its solar arrays to keep it operational. It's ready for a rendezvous with a comet Aug. 6.

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Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola. Jose Rovira (center), a World Health Organization logistics expert, trains residents of Pendembu to bury an Ebola victim without touching the body -- a dramatic change in a place where family and friends traditionally wash and embrace a loved one's body. The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola. To confirm the cause of death, Rovira of the World Health Organization takes a swab from a suspected Ebola victim in Pendembu village. The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body. Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.

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Over the last dozen years, whistleblowers at the National Security Agency have had a rough track record, facing FBI raids and lawsuits. (Reuters/Landov)

Before Snowden: The Whistleblowers Who Tried To Lift The Veil

Jul 22, 2014 (Morning Edition)

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Bill Binney (shown here in Berlin, Germany, on July 3) worked for the NSA for three decades before quitting after he discovered the agency was using software he created for domestic spying on U.S. citizens. Thomas Drake (also shown here in Berlin on July 3), another NSA whistleblower, was charged with violating the Espionage Act for showing unclassified NSA information to a reporter. Edward Snowden, the NSA contractor who exposed some of the agency's deepest secrets, learned from Binney's and others' mistakes and collected extensive documentation to support his claims. To confirm the cause of death, Rovira of the World Health Organization takes a swab from a suspected Ebola victim in Pendembu village. The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body. Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.

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Seventy years old and on crutches, both legs lost to diabetes, Bill Binney worked at the National Security Agency nearly three decades as one of its leading crypto-mathematicians.

He then became one of its leading whistleblowers.

Binney recalls the July morning seven years ago when a dozen gun-wielding FBI agents burst through the front door of his home, at the end of a cul-de-sac a 10-minute drive from the NSA's headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.

"I first knew that they were in there when they were pointing a gun at me as I was coming out of the shower," Binney says.

When I ask him why the agents were there, he replies: "Well, it was to keep us quiet."

The NSA is overseen by Congress, the courts, and other government departments. It's also supposed to be watched from the inside by its own workers.

But over the last dozen years, whistleblowers like Binney have had a rough track record.

Those who tried unsuccessfully to work within the system say Edward Snowden — the former National Security Agency contractor who shared top-secret documents with reporters — learned from their bitter experience.

For Binney, the decision to quit the NSA and become a whistleblower began a few weeks after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, when he says he discovered the spy agency had begun using software he'd created to scoop up information on Americans — all without a court order.

"I had to get out of there, because they were using the program I built to do domestic spying, and I didn't want any part of it, I didn't want to be associated with it," he says. "I look at it as basically treason. They were subverting the Constitution."

Binney says he and two other NSA colleagues who also quit tried sounding the alarm with congressional committees. But because they did not have documents to prove their charges, nobody believed them. Snowden, he says, did not repeat that mistake.

"He recognized right away, it was very clear to me, that if he wanted anybody to believe him, he'd have to take a lot of documentation with him — which is what he did," Binney says.

'Your Life Is Never The Same'

And that's why, he says, Snowden has had such an impact. Others have tried to work within the system. For example, computer expert Thomas Drake thought blowing the whistle on what he considered unconstitutional NSA programs would shake things up there. Instead, what got shaken up was his own life.

"The only person who was investigated, prosecuted, charged in secret, then was indicted, then ended up facing trial and 35 years in prison was myself," he says.

Drake had taken his case both to the NSA and Congress. After concluding his complaints were going nowhere, he showed unclassified information from the NSA to a newspaper reporter. For that he was charged with violating the Espionage Act. The FBI raided his home, too — four months after Binney's.

"Your life's never the same. All your colleagues and people you used to work with all disappear. You're persona non grata, you're radioactive," he says.

"On top of that, you're spending tens of thousands of dollars defending yourself with a private attorney. So now you're practically bankrupt, you're declared indigent before the court, your family's questioning who you are and what you're up to and why you brought all this on us."

The case against Drake fell apart days before he was to go to trial in 2011; he got off with a misdemeanor plea bargain and these days works at an Apple store. Like Binney, Drake thinks what happened to him was a cautionary tale for Snowden.

"Snowden carefully saw what happened to me and others, and it was clear ... there was no other recourse," he says.

Not everyone agrees.

"Snowden could've come to me," says George Ellard, the NSA's inspector general. "In fact, he would have been given some protections."

Earlier this year, Ellard spoke at Georgetown University's Law School. He said he could not say what would have been the proper way for Snowden to raise his concerns, but the way it happened was very, very bad. Snowden says he did try to blow the whistle internally at the NSA, but Ellard said he'd never heard from him.

"Perhaps it's the case that we could've shown, we could've explained to Mr. Snowden his misperceptions, his lack of understanding of what we do," Ellard said.

New Protections For Whistleblowers

Since Snowden made off with the NSA's secrets, the rules for whistleblowers have changed. President Obama has issued a directive aimed at giving greater protections to whistleblowers working for intelligence agencies, since they did not have the protections covering other federal employees.

"Supervisors and managers need to understand that whistleblowing is a lawful mission in the national security interest," says Dan Meyer, a former federal whistleblower.

He now works for the Inspector General at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. What's new is the job Meyer holds: executive director for intelligence community whistleblowing and source protection. He says he looks out for potential whistleblowers as much as the spy agencies that employ them.

"We need to get to that employee in the last cubicle, in the furthest-most office whose hoodie is about to go up, and let them know that if they need to get this information to somebody who can address the wrongdoing, we have a way of proceeding with that process," Meyer says.

Under the president's new directive, which Congress just codified into law, someone like Thomas Drake who tried blowing the whistle while still working at the NSA would have a chance to have appeal to inspectors general at other intelligence agencies. Such a hearing, though, is by no means guaranteed. And the protections don't extend to everyone: Former employees such as Bill Binney would not be covered, nor would outside contractors like Edward Snowden.

"At the moment, they are absolutely hung out to dry," says Danielle Brian, whistleblower advocate and executive director of the Project on Government Oversight.

"And what's extraordinary is the intelligence community has been increasingly privatizing its activities," Brian says. "You're having more and more people who are private contractors with the highest level of clearances who find out about some of the most potentially troubling misconduct, but they are without any serious protections."

She's pleased that Meyer has been put in charge of implementing the new whistleblower guidelines. But she says there are other problems with the new rules — they still don't get whistleblowers' complaints out of the intelligence community and into the courts, where she says whistleblowers want them to be.

The only time they do get into the courts is when they're charged with a crime, including under the Espionage Act. Jesslyn Radack of the Government Accountability Project is a lawyer for both Edward Snowden and Thomas Drake.

"The Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act says you can't retaliate against someone for blowing the whistle, but provides no remedy when you are retaliated against," Radack says.

That retaliation can take the form of being stripped of your security clearance, making it impossible to do your job. When I asked whistleblower Bill Binney his advice for anyone thinking of doing what he did, he had a ready reply:

"The first thing is get a lawyer, get legal advice," he said.

The other thing, Binney added, is never compromise your character and integrity.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

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