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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Sen. John McCain Calls Lengthy Execution In Arizona 'Torture'

by Eyder Peralta
Jul 25, 2014

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Sen. John McCain, a Republican from Arizona, says the execution of Joseph Rudolph Wood, which took nearly two hours, amounted to torture.

Politico reports:

"The longtime Republican lawmaker, who experienced years of torture while being held in captivity by the North Vietnamese during the Vietnam War, called the drawn-out lethal injection execution of Joseph Wood on Wednesday 'terrible.'

"'I believe in the death penalty for certain crimes. But that is not an acceptable way of carrying it out. And people who were responsible should be held responsible,' he said in an interview. 'The lethal injection needs to be an indeed lethal injection and not the bollocks-upped situation that just prevailed. That's torture.'"

As Bill reported, there are different interpretations of what happened on Wednesday. Wood's lawyer said that he watched his client gasp and snort for more than an hour after a lethal mix of drugs were injected into his body.

Family members of Debra Dietz and her father, Eugene Dietz, who Wood shot to death, said his execution was "nothing."

Arizona's Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Zick told a judge that Wood's reported gasping was an involuntary reaction, that Wood was "effectively brain-dead" when that happened.

Gov. Jan Brewer did not cast judgement on the process but she ordered a full review of it and any further executions in the state have been halted pending the result of that review.

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Philip Seymour Hoffman Leaves Indelible Bond In 'Most Wanted Man'

Jul 25, 2014 (Fresh Air)

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David Edelstein

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

Tim Gunn: On And Off The Runway, 'Life Is A Big Collaboration'

Jul 25, 2014 (Fresh Air)

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"Make it work," the fashion guru tells designers on Project Runway. But life hasn't always "worked" for Gunn. He talks with Terry Gross about being bullied, being gay in the '60s and '70s, and how his mother thinks he should "dress more like Mitt Romney."

Originally broadcast on Feb. 5, 2014.

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In this photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope Francis has lunch at the Vatican workers' cafeteria on Friday. (AP)

Pope Francis To Visit U.S. Next Year

Jul 25, 2014

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Pope Francis has accepted an invitation to visit Philadelphia in September 2015, a trip that would mark his first to the U.S. as pontiff.

Catholic News Service quotes Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi as saying that the pope has expressed "his willingness to participate in the World Meeting of Families" in Philadelphia, and that he's also received invitations to visit New York, the United Nations and Washington, D.C., which he's considering.

Time magazine notes: "The Vatican's Pontifical Council for the Family sponsors the World Meeting of Families every three years in a different city. The upcoming gathering is still more than a year away, and Pope Francis is likely to push for more activity on the issues of family and marriage before then — at least if his workrate continues at its current pace."

In March, a CBS News poll showed that Francis, who at that point had been pope for just a year, was more popular among U.S. Catholics than either of his predecessors, Benedict XVI or John Paul II, at the same point in their papacies.

He enjoyed a 68 percent "favorable" rating, compared with 40 percent for Pope Benedict and 59 percent for John Paul II. Nearly as many, 64 percent, saw Francis as helping the church, while 27 percent viewed him as a "mixed blessing."

Much of Francis' popularity has been attributed to his ability to connect with average people — not just Catholics — with such encounters as the one on Friday, in which he appeared unannounced at the Vatican workers' cafeteria, took a tray and got in line amid stunned diners.

Cashier Claudia Di Giacomo told Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano that Francis had a plate of cod, a bowl of fusilli pasta (without sauce), a side of grilled tomatoes and "just a few" French fries, but that she "didn't have the courage to hand him the bill."

Later, Francis chatted with five Vatican pharmacy clerks at his table.

Further to his plan to visit the U.S., CNS says: "Some Mexican media have cited government officials saying a September trip to North America also could include stops in Mexico, but Father Lombardi said that at this moment 'nothing operational has begun relative to a plan or program for a visit to the United States or Mexico. Keep in mind, there is still more than a year to go before the meeting in Philadelphia.' "

In January 2015, Francis is expected to visit the predominately Catholic Philippines and Sri Lanka, a mainly Buddhist nation.

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ER Physician Documents 'Lost Underground' of WWI

Jul 25, 2014 (Here & Now / WBUR-FM)

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Dr. Jeffrey Gusky is one of few people outside the world of scholars and local landowners who have seen the artwork carved by WWI soldiers on the walls of vast quarry systems beneath the trenches that defined the so-called “Great War.”

These underground cities were home for months on end for soldiers engaged in the bloody warfare on the western front of the war.

Gusky, who is also emergency room physician in Dallas, photographed “The Hidden World of the Great War” for the August issue of National Geographic magazine. He joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss what he saw and documented.

Guest

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