Skip Navigation
NPR News

White House Adviser: Cease-Fire Should Include Demilitarization Of Gaza

by Eyder Peralta
Jul 23, 2014

Hear this

This text will be replaced
Launch in player

Share this


Explore this

Reported by

Eyder Peralta

A top White House adviser says any cease-fire agreement between Israel and Palestinians must include the demilitarization of Gaza.

In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, White House adviser Tony Blinken said "that needs to be the end result."

"There has to be some way forward that does not involve Hamas having the ability to continue to rain down rockets on Israeli civilians," Blinken said.

Steve then asked if this means the U.S. endorsed Israel's demand that Hamas give up its weapons.

"One of the results, one would hope, of a cease fire would be some form of demilitarization, so that again, this doesn't continue, doesn't repeat itself," Blinken said. "This is what we've seen happen multiple times over the past few years, which is these rockets coming from Gaza, which Hamas controls, as well as more recently the tunneling to Israel with terrorists trying to infiltrate Israel. And no country can accept that. So that needs to be the end result of this process."

Of course, this is news because Hamas is unlikely to accept that demand and adding it as a pre-condition to a cease-fire agreement may mean this current conflict may be prolonged.

Aaron David Miller, a well-known Middle East analysts and vice president for new initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, wrote in Foreign Policy that the demilitarization of Gaza is "on the far end of the outcome spectrum."

He continues:

"This would mean a cessation of hostilities far different than in previous rounds of fighting. It would require a fundamental change in Gaza's political situation brought about either by military or diplomatic means. ...

"It would also require someone to assume real responsibility for Gaza. A transformed and defanged Hamas is hard to imagine. But if Israel forcibly tried to dismantle Hamas as an organization, there would likely be massive casualties on both sides. And in these circumstances neitherEgypt, let alone the Palestinian Authority, could ride into Gaza on the backs of Israeli tanks amid the carnage.

"Demilitarization is impossible without a diplomatic solution by which Hamas agrees to give up its weapons in exchange for a fundamental change in the economic and political conditions in Gaza, perhaps a kind of mini Marshall Plan."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

Top Stories: Kerry In Israel; Victims' Bodies Returning To Netherlands

Jul 23, 2014

Hear this

Launch in player

Share this


Explore this

Reported by

Korva Coleman

Good morning, here are our early stories:

— Gaza Conflict, Day 16: Here's What You Need To Know.

— Dutch Day Of Mourning, As Remains Of Some MH17 Victims Come Home.

And here are more early headlines:

Last Body Believed Found From Washington State Mudslide. (KOMO)

19 Uncontained Wildfires Burning In Oregon And Washington State. (Oregon Dept. of Forestry)

Perdue Wins Georgia GOP Senate Nomination. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

Federal Judge May Soon Rule On Colorado Same Sex Marriage. (Denver Post)

Typhoon Crashes Into Taiwan, Heads For China. (VOA)

Salvage Team Raises Sunken Cruise Ship Off Italy. (BBC)

Parts Of Chinese City Under Quarantine After Bubonic Plague Report. (ABC)

Huge Fire Burning At North Dakota Oil Supply Business. (Los Angeles Times)

L.A. Clippers Owner Sterling Files New Suit Against Wife, NBA. (CNN)

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo, of the Danish band The Raveonettes (Courtesy of the artist)

The Raveonettes, 'Killer In The Streets'

Jul 23, 2014

Hear this

Launch in player

Share this


The ocean serene, the sharks below: That's the contrast of noise and melody The Raveonettes do so well, and one you can hear on this song, "Killer In The Streets." The Danish duo are Sune Rose Wagner on guitar and vocals, along with Sharin Foo on bass, guitar and vocals. "Killer In The Streets" is from the new album Pe'ahi, which The Raveonettes released this week without any advance notice.

Sune Rose Wagner told us via email that "Killer In The Streets" is "about being lured in by beauty and mystique and how deceitful and devastating it can be to a young man. It's our take on a hypnotic groove which pulls the listener in unknowingly." The band will begin a U.S. tour in the fall.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
A woman lights a candle near flowers and candles placed in honor of three citizens -- a mother, her 17-year-old daughter and 13-year-old son -- who were among the victims of flight MH17 in Delft, Netherlands on Wednesday. (AP)

Dutch Day Of Mourning, As Remains Of Some MH17 Victims Come Home

by Eyder Peralta
Jul 23, 2014

Hear this

Launch in player

Share this


When the two military planes land at the Eindhoven airport, The Netherlands will come to a standstill.

King Willem Alexander, Queen Maxima and Prime Minister Mark Rutte will be waiting at the airport along with relatives of the 193 Dutch residents who died after Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was downed over eastern Ukraine.

Almost a week after the tragedy and after a protracted international scramble to remove bodies and evidence from a war-zone in Ukraine, there will be some closure today.

DutchNews.nl reports that for the first time since the death of Queen Wilhelmina in 1962, the country has declared a day of mourning.

"Flags will be at half mast on government buildings and church bells will be rung for five minutes prior to the landing of the first plane bringing back the first bodies of the dead," the website reports.

Bloomberg reports that once the planes lands, the country will observe one minute of silence.

After that, begins the grim task of identifying the remains, which Prime Minister Rutte said "may take months."

The plane is scheduled to land at 10 a.m. ET. We'll update this post once that has happened.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Always and forever (iStockphoto)

Without Conflict There Is No Growth

by Marcelo Gleiser
Jul 23, 2014

Hear this

Launch in player

Share this


Explore this

Reported by

Marcelo Gleiser

Where do values come from? Culture? Life experience? Family traditions? Upbringing? Religion? How do we decide what is right and what is wrong, given that, in most situations, there are arguments for and against opposing viewpoints? Often, what is right for one person is wrong for another, and from these tensions conflict arises. We see this in our families, in our workplace, in religious conflicts, in political disputes. If, on the one hand, diversity of opinion is what enriches us as humans, on the other, it is what feeds the worse that we have to offer.

Given this familiar framework, how can we choose a path that leads to a better life, with more personal and social harmony?

It would be quite na´ve to expect a life without conflict, na´ve and boring. After all, as we struggle to find solutions, conflict leads to new ways of thinking. Nothing ever changes in a world without discord. We see this in our lives; we see this in science. In fact, in science crises are essential: without them there is no innovation. A life lived in harmony can't be a life without conflict. It must be a life where conflict leads to growth. Harmony is not the absence of conflict. It is the state in which conflict leads to positive change. Harmony is dynamic, not static.

Innovation and growth challenge the status quo, shaking the very foundations where most base their values. Change only comes when we are ready to embrace it; change needs open minds. It's much easier to plant our feet in the traditional, the convenient, in what doesn't force us to reexamine our views. No one likes to be wrong. This is why great innovation comes with revolution, often bloody. The blood that is spilled is not always the one coursing through our veins: it is the blood of conviction, of prejudices, of deep-seated ideas that are abandoned by the inexorable force of reason.

We live in a world of rapid change. It's not just the Internet revolution, with its easy access to information and the democratization of opinion. It's how the Internet promotes conflict, good and bad. It's amusing how brave people become on the Internet as they hide behind a pseudonym; they attack with impunity, self-defined authorities in all topics, presenting their opinion as the only reasonable or plausible, even when part of an open discussion forum. (No doubt this will happen here, as it does in any open Internet forum.) As my son, who works for Google, once told me, the Internet shows the best and worse of humankind. The challenge is to make it into a force for constructive conflict. Perhaps the 13.7 community could set the example?

The Enlightenment used values from classical science to forge a new worldview, based on universal equality. As I wrote last week, we need a new Enlightenment for the 21st century. A good start would be to leave cynicism aside, as it goes nowhere. Discord is necessary, but it can't be purely destructive.

So, here we go: What are the values that would forge a new worldview? For one thing, they must be secular. The protection of all life forms and of the planet is a good start.

If we are rare molecular machines capable of self-reflection, we should act in enlightened ways. We are far from this goal. But, since the first step toward change is the awareness of the need for change, there is hope. What do you suggest?


Marcelo Gleiser's latest book is The Island Of Knowledge: The Limits Of Science And The Search For Meaning. You can keep up with Marcelo on Facebook and Twitter: @mgleiser

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.