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Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

With Final Broadcast, 'Tell Me More' Bids Farewell

by Alan Greenblatt
Aug 1, 2014

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Michel Martin speaks with Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado by phone for Tell Me More.

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Alan Greenblatt

After seven years, NPR's Tell Me More is going off the air on Friday.

The final program can be heard on member stations and will be live-streamed on this page, beginning at 11 a.m. ET. It will include the show's popular Barbershop roundtable, a political chat, a discussion of faith and a live musical performance.

The show has focused on issues of particular — though by no means exclusive — concern to African Americans and other people of color. Host Michel Martin made it a point to interview not just newsmakers and policy analysts but everyday people who shared both their stories and perspective on matters ranging from poverty to parenting.

After one segment aired about a woman who struggled to get her children across town to school following her separation from her husband, "for weeks afterward people stopped me on the street to tell me how it haunted them," Michel recalled in a recent essay for National Journal.

NPR announced in May that it was canceling the show, which drew a fair amount of criticism. Leslie Alexander of Fulton, Md., spoke for many disappointed listeners when she wrote to NPR's ombudsman that "Tell Me More is the only show I know of that features 'minority" stories as just regular stories.....Where else can you hear a discussion about the issues of the day and the panelists are from four or five different ethnic or racial groups but no one is expected to be the spokesperson for their ethnicity or race?"

Michel and Carline Watson, the program's executive producer, will remain with NPR as part of its new Identity and Culture Unit, which will help incorporate broader coverage of issues such as race, faith, gender and family online, at public events and in the network's flagship newsmagazines.

Listeners and contributors have been sharing stories and tweeting photos this week about their determination to stick with Michel on NPR and on Twitter. In her last "Can I Just Tell You" essay for Tell Me More, Michel said that the job of telling the stories of people often ignored by the media is far from finished.

"There's still a pie out there, many stories yet to tell," Michel wrote. "We are going to keep looking for those."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

How To Mark 10 Years Of Co-Hosting 'Morning Edition'? Take A Break!

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

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Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

Everyone Goes To The Store To Get Milk. So Why's It Way In The Back?

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

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Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

Pa. Man's Parting Message: 'Please Don't Email Me, I'm Dead'

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

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Gaza City, northern Gaza Strip, is seen shortly before the start of a proposed cease-fire on Friday. (AP)

Fighting Resumes In Gaza, As Israeli Military Says Cease-Fire Is Over

by Eyder Peralta
Aug 1, 2014

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Eyder Peralta

It was negotiated as a three-day humanitarian cease-fire that was to start at 8 a.m. local time today.

But just hours in, fighting erupted again in Gaza.

Palestinian authorities told the AP that at least 27 people were killed in Gaza after an Israeli tank opened fire. NPR's Emily Harris reports Israel accused Hamas of continuing its rocket fire.

One Israeli official told Emily: "At this point it's clear the Palestinians violated the ceasefire in three ways. They attacked us in Gaza, they sent rockets toward Israeli cities and they fired mortar shells on the Kerem crossing."

Right before 2 p.m. local time, Peter Lerner, a spokesman for Israel Defense Forces, said the cease-fire was over.

With that here's what you need to know as the conflict enters its 25th day:

— An Israeli Soldier Abducted?

Lerner also tells NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson that as Israeli forces were working to decommission a tunnel, an Israeli soldier was "abducted by terrorists."

He said the IDF suspects the soldier has been kidnapped and the military is now carrying out extensive operations to locate the soldier.

"We are continuing our activities on the ground," said Lerner. "There is aircraft in the sky as we speak."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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