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Louis C.K. Reflects On 'Louie,' Loss, Love And Life

Aug 27, 2014 (Fresh Air)

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C.K. won an Emmy for outstanding writing in a comedy series for an episode on his FX show Louie. In 2011, C.K. told Fresh Air about making his comedy special and his relationship with other comedians.

Originally broadcast Dec. 13, 2011.

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Aaron Paul On Playing A Meth Dealer On 'Breaking Bad'

Aug 27, 2014 (Fresh Air)

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Paul won the Emmy for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series for playing student-turned-drug dealer Jesse Pinkman. In 2011, he said his character was supposed to die in the first season.

Originally broadcast Sept. 19, 2011.

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Sarah Silverman Discusses Her Movie 'Jesus Is Magic'

Aug 27, 2014 (Fresh Air)

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Silverman won the Emmy for best writing for a variety special for her HBO special We Are Miracles. In 2005, she spoke with Fresh Air about her movie based on her acts in New York and Los Angeles.

Originally broadcast Nov. 09, 2005.

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Ted Leo and Aimee Mann as The Both, in a scene from their new video for the song "Volunteers Of America." (Courtesy of the artist)

The Both, 'Volunteers of America'

Aug 27, 2014

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Aimee Mann and Ted Leo of The Both

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Aimee Mann and Ted Leo's latest video as The Both, for the song "Volunteers Of America," is part playful comedy, part wistful love story. The two join a cast of friends and family for an outdoor wedding, where a man and woman in their sunset years renew their vows, before the group breaks into an all-night party. It's a simple but affecting story the celebrates the mysterious human experience.

The video, directed by Daniel Ralston, also features cameos from musicians Susanna Hoffs (The Bangles) and London May (Samhain), who play in the wedding band. Veteran actor Russ Tamblyn, known for his roles in West Side Story, Twin Peaks and more recently the film Drive, plays the part of the groom. The video was shot at Frank Sinatra's former house. Aimee Mann and Ted Leo also don wigs to play dual roles as their alter egos, aunt Connie and Ed Leo.

"'Volunteers of America' is my favorite song of the year," director Ralston told us via email. "When I hear it I picture people jumping around and having fun, maybe in a bouncy castle. Aimee gets to cut loose a little form her usual 'straight person' role in funny videos and Ted got to play Ed Leo, a character we came up with together."

"Volunteers Of America" is from The Both's debut, self-titled album.

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An Israeli couple, Noga and Moshiko Siho, kiss after they have their wedding photos taken Wednesday in an army staging area on the Israel-Gaza border, near Kibbutz Yad Mordechai, Israel. (AP)

As Cease-Fire Takes Hold, Big Question In Gaza Becomes What's Next

by Eyder Peralta
Aug 27, 2014

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Eyder Peralta

Some semblance of normal life returned to Gaza on Wednesday.

The day after Hamas and Israel accepted an open-ended cease-fire, Palestinians returned to their homes, markets opened and bulldozers began clearing the rubble while in Israel, the sirens warning of rockets fell silent.

Naturally, the Palestinians, Israelis and the world started looking toward the future and began asking a tough question: What's next?

The New York Times reports:

"The agreement, brokered by Egypt, calls for Israel to allow humanitarian aid and building materials through the border crossings it controls into Gaza. But it remained unclear who would oversee the reconstruction effort and monitor imported cement and concrete to allay Israeli concerns that it be used only for civilian purposes.

"Discussion of the broader Israeli-Palestinian conflict, along with demands by Hamas, the Islamist faction that dominates Gaza, for a seaport and airport in Gaza — and by Israel for the demilitarization of the territory — were put off for up to a month.

"'I don't think that any declaration here is important, who won what,' Yaakov Amidror, a former Israeli national security adviser, told reporters in an afternoon conference call Wednesday. 'What's important is what will happen in the future.'"

More immediately, Reuters reports that the truce has already started having an impact on the ground. Egypt, for example, eased restrictions at the Rafah border crossing with Gaza. It allowed a shipment of 25,000 food parcels from the World Food Program to enter Gaza for the first time 2007.

Al Jazeera's Jane Ferguson tweeted that for the first time in a while in Gaza, "you can feel relief in the air."

Still, one thing most people will agree on is that all of the big issues that led to this conflict remain unresolved.

In today's opinion page, the Israeli newspaper Haaretz took shots at both sides, saying both committed war crimes in this conflict. What this war should teach the world is that a long-term peace cannot be accomplished through military might, it said. A long-lasting peace will come only through sincere negotiations.

Haaretz concludes:

"Over the last 50 days, cemeteries filled with bodies and hospitals overflowed with wounded. Rubble piled up and hatred and fear overflowed their banks on both sides. But this cloud could yet have a silver lining: Perhaps Israel, for the first time in its history, will fundamentally change its approach.

"It sounds ridiculous now. But how is it possible to end this cursed war without at least envisioning hope?"

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