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Palestinian relatives cry when mourners carry out the body of Baraa Mogdadm, 6, one of nine people killed in an explosion at a park in the northern Gaza Strip on Monday (AP)

Netanyahu: Israel Prepared For 'Long Operation' In Gaza

by Alan Greenblatt
Jul 28, 2014

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday dismissed international calls for an immediate ceasefire in the country's conflict with Hamas in Gaza.

"We need to be prepared for a long operation until our mission is accomplished," Netanyahu said in televised remarks.

He defined that mission as Israeli officials have since launching a ground offensive in Gaza — taking out the tunnels Hamas uses to infiltrate Israel.

"Israeli citizens cannot live with the threat from rockets and from death tunnels — death from above and from below," Netanyahu said, adding that Israelis would not "end this operation without neutralizing the tunnels, whose sole purpose is killing our citizens."

After a brief lull in fighting to mark a Muslim holiday — and following adoption of a United Nations Security Council resolution calling for an "immediate and unconditional" cease-fire — intense shelling resumed in Gaza Monday night.

"The Israeli Defense Forces warned residents of neighborhoods in northern Gaza - including Shujai'iya, the scene of some of the most intense fighting in the three-week war - to evacuate immediately, suggesting a major escalation of military action was imminent," the Guardian reports.

Five IDF soldiers were killed Monday in Gaza, bringing Israel's military death toll to 48.

As we reported earlier, more than 1,000 Palestinians have been killed, mostly civilians. Thousands more have been injured.

On the diplomatic front, Obama administration officials pushed back against harsh criticism in Israeli news outlets of Secretary of State John Kerry's efforts to secure a truce. A draft of his cease-fire proposal was leaked to Israeli media.

"It's as if he isn't the foreign minister of the world's most powerful nation, but an alien, who just disembarked his spaceship in the Mideast," wrote diplomatic correspondent Barak Ravid in Haaretz.

Ravid and other mocking commentators took Kerry to task for attempting to bring Qatar and Turkey — viewed in Israel as Hamas allies — into negotiations.

Susan Rice, President Obama's national security adviser, described herself as "dismayed" by the characterizations.

"Our view is it's simply not the way partners and allies treat each other," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

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Customers can get a tactile experience trying on glasses at Warby Parker's shop in New York City. (NPR)

It's Boom Times For Pop-Up Shops As Mobile Shopping Clicks

Jul 28, 2014 (All Things Considered)

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A pop-up sale in the Bowery neighborhood of New York City. Dave Gilboa is co-founder of Warby Parker, the primarily online eyewear store. Warby Parker experimented with a variety of pop-up locations before settling into a longer-term lease.

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Fast-rising mobile technology is making buying stuff with a tap of an app easier than ever, and shifting the way we shop. What were once permanent, brick-and-mortar stores, where shoppers look at items in a physical space, are now often pop-ups, first — shops that last for a limited time only.

Pop-up shops are temporary retail spaces that spring up in unused premises. Leases can last as short as a single day, when brands use the spaces for a promotional event instead of testing out a market.

"As long as they can change it back, they can do whatever they want," says Joe LaPadula. He works for OpenHouse, a company that owns storefronts in the always fashion-forward Soho neighborhood in New York.

These days, the pop-up concept is proliferating in trendy, high-foot-traffic neighborhoods like SoHo.

"Pop-ups, or this idea of selling something for a temporary period of time, has been around since human trade has been around," says LaPadula. OpenHouse rents its storefronts out for retail, promotional events, exhibits — whatever clients need.

Today, an old subway stop in SoHo is a place to get designer pants at 40 percent off. On other days, it's a test kitchen and bar. Next week, it might host a press event. The one thing this place doesn't do is anything permanent.

"With food trucks becoming more and more open and available, and the kind of migration of bringing that, I actually think that pop-up shops kind of followed suit," says Los Angeles-based retail industry consultant Syama Meagher. She's been watching pop-up retailing develop for the last half decade.

As consumers do more and more on mobile devices, short-term leases promised by pop-ups mean brands can be more mobile, too — moving around to where their customers cluster.

"Larger online brands are bridging together these empty spaces and starting to find ways to get in front of their customers," says Meagher.

The old retail world meant long-established brands existed first in brick-and-mortar stores. Then, they expanded online. Now, the model is flipped.

"The business model is innovative in a way, and that's because you can now start a company on Internet, and there's this intermediate step between a brick-and-mortar where you pop-up and have this tactile, real experience," says LaPadula.

That "clicks-to-bricks" model, as the marketing folks call it, is exactly what happened with the eyewear brand, Warby Parker.

"When we launched, we had no plans to open physical stores, so we're kind of learning as we go along," says Dave Gilboa, a Warby Parker co-founder.

Just as food trucks let potential restaurants test their menus and find an audience, the pop-up shop serves as a modern-day lab for retailers. The four-year-old company first learned by using the co-founders' apartment as a showroom. They also experimented with a traveling bus full of eyeglass frames before opening a series of holiday pop-up shops in SoHo.

"It was just kind of a fun space for us to really experiment," Gilboa says.

While you can easily buy Warby Parker frames without ever stepping foot into a store — and many people do — the glasses brand found that many of its customers still crave a physical experience. So what were once Warby Parker pop-ups have become something permanent.

The company now has three sprawling New York locations, with long-term leases, something the original business plan never anticipated.

"There's still something tangible that you can't replace, when you're walking into store, engaging all five senses," Gilboa says.

The shopping options now before us engage not just all our senses, but all our spaces — real-life and virtual.

"You're going to have a chance to experience brands unlike you have before. Being that they're going to be in your hands, in your face and in your minds and on your phone all at once, and all at one time," says consultant Syama Meagher.

A lot for customers to consider.

And for the brands, experimenting with spaces that don't last ... can lead to a lasting business.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Customers can get a tactile experience trying on glasses at Warby Parker's shop in New York City. (NPR)

In Colo., An Effort To Ease Court Confusion Over Same-Sex Marriage

by Megan Verlee
Jul 28, 2014 (All Things Considered / Colorado Public Radio)

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A pop-up sale in the Bowery neighborhood of New York City. Dave Gilboa is co-founder of Warby Parker, the primarily online eyewear store. Warby Parker experimented with a variety of pop-up locations before settling into a longer-term lease.

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The Colorado attorney general has asked the state's Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages. As Colorado Public Radio's Megan Verlee reports, he's trying to have the matter both ways — dropping his opposition to lawsuits against the state's gay marriage ban, while still pushing the courts to continue enforcing it.

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Customers can get a tactile experience trying on glasses at Warby Parker's shop in New York City. (NPR)

After 5 Weeks Of Haggling, Congress Inks Bipartisan VA Bill

Jul 28, 2014 (All Things Considered / Colorado Public Radio)

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A pop-up sale in the Bowery neighborhood of New York City. Dave Gilboa is co-founder of Warby Parker, the primarily online eyewear store. Warby Parker experimented with a variety of pop-up locations before settling into a longer-term lease.

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Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Customers can get a tactile experience trying on glasses at Warby Parker's shop in New York City. (NPR)

Sometimes You Feel Like A Nut, Sometimes You Just Drive One

by Alex Schmidt
Jul 28, 2014 (All Things Considered / Colorado Public Radio)

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A pop-up sale in the Bowery neighborhood of New York City. Dave Gilboa is co-founder of Warby Parker, the primarily online eyewear store. Warby Parker experimented with a variety of pop-up locations before settling into a longer-term lease.

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After graduation, Mason Kerwick landed a nutty job — quite literally. For the next year, he'll drive the Planters Peanut Nutmobile, marketing the peanut brand. His first assignment? Driving the peanut-shaped truck into New York City for Macy's July Fourth parade.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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