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Pokey LaFarge performs at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Pokey LaFarge, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 28, 2014

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You can bundle it up in MP3s and send it zinging through the ether, but Pokey LaFarge's music still seems as though it has emerged from the dustiest 78 at the thrift shop. LaFarge is a man out of time and a true wanderer, with the vintage clothing to match, but he never seems like a mere novelty act: His songs are too sturdy, with too much infectiously zippy energy, to feel anything but authentic.

The singer and his band now record for Jack White's Third Man Records — a sublime fit if ever there was one — and last year put out a marvelous self-titled album, which LaFarge produced with the aid of Old Crow Medicine Show singer Ketch Secor. Hear the band perform as part of the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Saturday, July 26 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "All Night Long"
  • "Bowlegged Woman"
  • "City Summer Blues"
  • "Cairo, Illinois"
  • "One Town At A Time"
  • "Sweet Potato Blues"
  • "When Did You Leave Heaven"
  • "Close The Door"
  • "The Good Lord Giveth (And Uncle Sam Taketh Away)"
  • "Kentucky Mae"
  • "Central Time"
  • "Josephine"
  • "In The Graveyard Now"
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Aoife O'Donovan performs with bassist Paul Kowert at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Aoife O'Donovan, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 28, 2014

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Aoife O'Donovan got her start in a pair of folk-leaning groups, Sometymes Why and Crooked Still, the latter of which became one of the country's top modern string bands. More recently, though, O'Donovan has established herself as a formidable folk-pop solo artist, with a lovely, Tucker Martine-produced debut album called Fossils.

O'Donovan has sung with Chris Thile and Yo-Yo Ma's Goat Rodeo project, and written for Alison Krauss & Union Station. But she was accompanied only by bassist Paul Kowert at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Saturday, July 26 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "Lay My Burden Down"
  • "Fire Engine"
  • "Thursday's Child"
  • "Oh, Mama"
  • "Hornets"
  • "Lovesick Redstick Blues"
  • "Pearls"
  • "Red & White & Blue & Gold"
  • "Bright Sunny South"
  • "Beekeeper"
  • "You Turn Me On, I'm A Radio"
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Aoife O'Donovan performs with bassist Paul Kowert at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Court Orders Russia To Pay Former Yukos Shareholders $50B

by Krishnadev Calamur
Jul 28, 2014

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Krishnadev Calamur

In 2003, Russia arrested the country's richest man, seized his main asset, Yukos Oil, broke it up and sold it. More than a decade later, a three-judge arbitration panel in The Hague ordered Moscow to pay the shareholders of the now defunct oil giant more than $50 billion.

The Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague said Yukos was "the object of a series of politically-motivated attacks by the Russian authorities that eventually led to its destruction." The July 18 order called the company's seizure "devious and calculated."

The amount is one of the biggest-ever compensation awards in an arbitration case, but shareholders had sought twice that figure. They had based their claim on Yukos' $100 billion valuation.

The court ordered Russia to pay the judgment within 180 days or begin paying interest. If Moscow fails to comply, shareholders can attempt to seize its assets overseas. But that may be easier said than done. As The Wall Street Journal notes, "[P]laintiffs in similar cases in the past have had mixed results attempting to seize Russian assets overseas."

Russia's Finance Ministry said the ruling was "politically biased," and said it will appeal.

The Associated Press adds:

"The ruling adds to tensions between Russia and the international community at a time when relations are at their lowest ebb since the end of the Cold War. Following the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over eastern Ukraine, the U.S. and European Union are debating further economic sanctions against Moscow because of its support for rebels suspected of launching the attack."

Late last year, Russian President Vladimir Putin pardoned Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the oligarch who controlled Yukos. Khodorkovsky was convicted of tax evasion in 2005 and found guilty of embezzlement in 2010. But critics of the Kremlin saw his treatment as punishment for daring to challenge the Kremlin.

The AP adds: "The Yukos takeover was the beginning of a process under which Russia, under President Vladimir Putin, re-took control of the country's energy industry. Yukos' main assets were sold at auction to a shell company. Just days later that company was bought up by state-owned Rosneft, making it the largest oil producer in Russia."

The case was brought by subsidiaries of GML Ltd., the former Menatep through which Khodorkovsky and his partners controlled Yukos.

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People shop outside of a Family Dollar discount store in Waterbury, Connecticut. (Getty Images)

Dollar Tree To Buy Family Dollar In $8.5 Billion Deal

by Eyder Peralta
Jul 28, 2014

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Eyder Peralta

With Dollar Tree's agreement to purchase Family Dollar on Monday, two of the United States' biggest discount stores are coming together in a deal estimated at $8.5 billion in cash and stock.

The New York Times reports:

"The deal comes amid pressure on Family Dollar by the activist investor Carl C. Icahn, who urged the company last month toexplore a sale of itself. But Family Dollar said in a statement that it had been exploring strategic options since the winter.

"Under the terms of Monday's deal, Dollar Tree will pay $74.50 for each share of Family Dollar. The bid is made up of $59.60 a share in cash and Dollar Tree stock worth about $14.90. Including debt, the deal values the target company at about $9.2 billion.

"The bid represents a premium of nearly 23 percent to Family Dollar's closing price on Friday."

The Wall Street Journal reports the deal has been approved by the boards of both companies. Dollar Tree, the Journal reports, will continue to operate Family Dollar as a separate brand and keep Family Dollar CEO Howard Levine.

The paper adds some background:

"Family Dollar, with more than 8,100 stores across the country, has been at a crossroads in its retail strategy. Early this year, Mr. Levine said the chain was shelving a strategy that used price cuts on some items, while keeping others elevated, and instead would emulate the everyday low price model favored by rivals Dollar General and Wal-Mart.

"In April, Family Dollar said it would close about 370 stores and lower prices on nearly 1,000 basic items in an effort to remain competitive. Earlier this month, it reported its fiscal third-quarter earnings slid 33% as higher costs offset a slight increase in revenue.

"Meanwhile, activist investors—like Mr. Icahn—have been flexing their muscles this year, pushing for everything from sales to boardroom shake-ups."

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
NPR One (NPR)

NPR One, Now Available At Your Preferred App Store

Jul 28, 2014

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NPR One

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NPR One is our new digital listening app that blends NPR and Member Station news reporting into a rich, localized, on-demand experience. We have been working on this new audio news app for iOS and Android for some time, and now it's your turn to download it and experience public radio made personal.

Listen to the latest local, national and international news in a curated stream customized for you. With NPR One you're in control: you can pause, skip or spend more time with the news and entertaining stories that you might have otherwise missed. NPR One remembers your history as you go, so you'll never hear the same story twice. Search for shows and podcasts, review your listening history or look ahead at upcoming stories.

With NPR One there is a new way to listen to public radio, one that's responsive to your tastes, your routines and your local interests. Open the app, and you'll hear the best news and programming from NPR and your local public radio station. As you listen you can mark individual stories as 'interesting' so it can better tailor the content just for you. It blends NPR's editorial judgment with your personal tastes and creates moments of discovery - things you didn't even know you'd find, sent right to your smart phone or tablet.

And the more you use NPR One, the better it will work. We want to make sure you can hear the important stories of the day crafted in a listening experience just for you. So start listening and when a story resonates with you, mark it as 'interesting' or share it with your friends. We think you'll be surprised how well NPR One fits into your day.

Background on the app (for the real public radio nerds)

The app has been developed with the participation of six Member Station partners:

KPCC-Southern California Public Radio; KQED-Public Media for Northern California; Minnesota Public Radio; WBUR-Boston; WHYY-Philadelphia; and WNYC-New York Public Radio.

The app was built by NPR's Digital Media and Digital Services divisions. It is an example of NPR's investments in the future of digital listening.

NPR One is supported in part by $10M in gifts and grants NPR announced in December 2013. The James L. Knight Foundation and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, together with Paul and Heather Haaga, William and Lia Poorvu, and Howard and Fredericka Stevenson, are behind this ambitious effort. The majority of the Knight Foundation's gift is comprised of matching grants to the six stations.

Join us now and discover public radio made personal.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

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