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Jeff Tweedy performs at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Jeff Tweedy, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 29, 2014

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There aren't a whole lot of failures on the resume of Jeff Tweedy, who co-piloted the groundbreaking alt-country band Uncle Tupelo in the '80s and early '90s, then multiplied its popularity as the leader of Wilco. In that band, Tweedy's refusal to compromise his vision led to his greatest commercial success, vaulting idiosyncratic records like Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and A Ghost Is Born into the canon.

In recent years, Tweedy has extended his reach behind the scenes, producing albums by the likes of Low and Newport headliner Mavis Staples (who made a guest appearance on stage just before her own set). But after dabbling in side projects like Golden Smog, he's also begun to work as a true solo artist, though his forthcoming album was assembled in collaboration with his teenage son Spencer.

Backed by his touring band and vocalists Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig — the co-leads of the band Lucius — Jeff Tweedy surveyed his career onstage as part of the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Sunday, July 27 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "Diamond Light Pt. 1"
  • "Flowering"
  • "Summer Noon"
  • "Honey Combed" (Feat. Lucius)
  • "Hazel"
  • "World Away"
  • "New Moon" (Feat. Lucius)
  • "High As Hello" (Feat. Lucius)
  • "Low Key" (Feat. Lucius)
  • "Fake Fur Coat"
  • "I Am Trying To Break Your Heart"
  • "New Madrid"
  • "Please Tell My Brother"
  • "Jesus, Etc." (Feat. Lucius)
  • "Wrote A Song For Everyone" (Feat. Mavis Staples and Lucius)
  • "Only The Lord Knows" (Feat. Mavis Staples and Lucius)
  • "California Stars"
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Conor Oberst performs at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Conor Oberst, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 29, 2014

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Far removed from his days as a white-knuckled teenage prodigy in Bright Eyes, Conor Oberst has settled into his 30s as a wise and wizened elder statesman. He's come to channel his youthful intensity into real showmanship, especially onstage, while continuing to mine powerful emotions and a sort of fearless poignancy in his songwriting.

Oberst has worked with many bands since Bright Eyes, including Desaparecidos and Monsters of Folk, but his latest record, the very fine Upside Down Mountain, is a solo album that finds him pairing inward-looking observations with outward-facing arrangements that project genuine soul and panache.

Onstage, he was joined by horns, backing vocalists and a set of faces familiar to Newport diehards: his touring partners in the roots-rock band Dawes, who perform a full set of their own earlier in the day. Hear Conor Oberst perform as part of the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Sunday, July 27 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "Time Forgot"
  • "Hundreds Of Ways"
  • "We Are Nowhere And It's Now"
  • "Zigzagging Toward The Light"
  • "Bowl Of Oranges"
  • "No One Would Riot For Less"
  • "Danny Callahan"
  • "Old Soul Song (For The New World Order)"
  • "Artifact #1"
  • "Governor's Ball"
  • "Double Life"
  • "Another Travelin' Song"
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Taylor Goldsmith of the band Dawes performs at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Dawes, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 29, 2014

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The Newport Folk Festival sells out months before its lineup is announced, but fans aren't entirely in the dark: Most know there's at least a 50 percent chance that the lineup will include the countrified California roots-rock band Dawes. Led by brothers Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith, Dawes is a heartwarming crowd-pleaser, both on stage and on albums like last year's Stories Don't End.

Dawes enthusiasts are doubly in luck with this year's lineup: The band not only gets its own set on the main stage, but also serves as Conor Oberst's backing players mere moments later. Hear Dawes perform as part of the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Sunday, July 27 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "That Western Skyline"
  • "Most People"
  • "Time Spent In Los Angeles"
  • "Things Happen"
  • "Fire Away"
  • "From A Window Seat"
  • "When My Time Comes"
  • "I Can't Think About It Now"
  • "A Little Bit Of Everything"
  • "From The Right Angle"
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Tim Perry and the band Ages and Ages perform at the 2014 Newport Folk Festival. (Adam Kissick for NPR)

Ages And Ages, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2014

Jul 29, 2014

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The Sunday lineup of 2014's Newport Folk Festival will take thousands of fans to church, as it opens with the Berklee Gospel & Roots Choir and closes with the gospel and R&B titan Mavis Staples. But in between, the lineup won't want for heavenward shouting: Ages and Ages plays sweetly shambling folk-rock, but its songs are infused with a communal spirit, heart-filling inspiration, and thoughts on how to live life fully and kindly.

Ages and Ages' second album, this year's Divisionary, is full of good-natured uplift, but its power is magnified dramatically by the live stage. Hear the octet perform as part of the 2014 Newport Folk Festival, recorded live on Sunday, July 27 in Newport, R.I.

Set List

  • "Light Goes Out"
  • "No Pressure"
  • "I See More"
  • "Navy Parade (Escape From The Black River Bluffs)"
  • "So So Freely"
  • "Souvenir"
  • "Our Demons"
  • "Over It"
  • "No Nostalgia"
  • "Divisionary (Do The Right Thing)" [Feat. Berklee Gospel & Roots Choir]
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Watch out Congress: Girl Up activists came to the nation's capital in June to lobby for issues affecting girls in the developing world. From left, Alexandrea Leone (Ewing, N.J.), Grace Peters (Flemington, N.J.), Aklesiya Dejene (Chicago, Ill.), Isabella Gonzalez and Erika Hiple (Stockton, N.J.) (NPR)

Time To 'Girl Up:' Teens Fight For The Right To School, Soccer

by Marc Silver
Jul 29, 2014

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They are seven girls in their teens and early 20s, awake at the ungodly (for them) hour of 8:30 a.m. With sleepy smiles, the young women slip into a windowless conference room in a Washington, D.C. hotel to talk to a reporter, who's curious to find out: What's it like to be a global girl activist?

And they're the experts. They're supporters of the U.N. Foundation group called Girl Up, which has the manifesto of "uniting girls to change the world."

Girl Up fights for the rights of the 600 million adolescent girls of the developing world. Many of these rights we take for granted: going to school, receiving proper health care, living in safety and simply being counted at birth (because, for example, if you don't have official proof of a child's age, then how can governments fight against child labor?)

These seven Girl Up activists run clubs in their schools. They speak out in public forums and raise money for U.N. programs that help their cause. Since Girl Up began in 2010, the clubs have collected more than $100,000.

Being involved in Girl Up is a serious commitment of time and energy. But the girls want me to know that activism is also fun.

"We get into super girly talk," says Alexandra Leane, who cofounded a Girl Up club at her New Jersey high school. "We show each other pictures of hot guys," teases Gloria Samen of Potomac, Md. Then they get down to business: Spreading the word about girl's issues.

Business brought them to the District in June. They were lobbying on Capitol Hill. "Girls just don't get as much resources and opportunities as men do," says Aklesiya Dejene, who emigrated from Ethiopia to Chicago two years ago. "I want to represent them."

In the freewheeling conversation, the young women shared their ideas about what the world's girls need. Carolina Lopez, who's from Sao Paulo, Brazil, but goes to school in Pennsylvania, wants them to have a chance to express themselves in sports. Rocio Ortega, a first generation Mexican-American, who lives in Los Angeles, agrees: "Sports is where girls can find their voice and self-confidence."

But boys can get in the way. When Lopez was in fourth grade, the boys she wanted to play soccer with went to her mom and said, "Can you please ask her to stop playing with us. She's bothering us." Lopez is still indignant: "I wasn't like catching the ball with my hands! Or doing something I wasn't supposed to. I was just there because I wanted to play. I was humiliated."

Ortega visited girls in an Ethiopian refugee camp, and they had similar concerns. They told her: "We want our own space to play sports. We want our own basketball court without having to worry about boys playing next to us." Girl Up supports programs that provide sports venues for girls.

As the American-born daughter of Cameroonian immigrants, Gloria Samen is keenly aware of obstacles girls face in her own culture: "I grew up watching generations of silent women, women who were expected to stay home," she says. Even now, her father thinks she should change the channel on the TV as part of her daughterly duties — even though the remote is by his side. She wants girls to fight unfair expectations.

Samen raised $3,000 for Girl Up and is proud that the money makes a difference in the lives of girls in faraway places. "We're able to change the lives of girls we would never meet," she says. "This women's network is an unbreakable bond. I think it's so cool."

Sometimes the goal is to give girls the power to speak out. Girls in her country don't always want to "stand up and say their name," says Thandiwe Diego of Belize. She stumbled upon Girl Up on the internet and started a club with the help of her mom. "They're really shy." And they can't always afford high school fees. So Diego and her mother encourage reticent girls to apply for scholarships. While in D.C., she got a joyful e-mail from her mom telling her that some girls had applied! It's a small but sweet success.

These seven activists know what it's like to face opposition. Jinwen Tung of China, now a student at Barnard, started a feminist-minded club in China. "Was it hard?" I ask. "Yes!" she declares. "Even my male classmates sometimes couldn't understand why women are so obsessed" with fighting for equality. "To them, it's just not necessary."

But she's an optimist. "I think today's boys are more able to put themselves in the shoes of girls," she says, especially if the girls of Girl Up "tell the boys" about the problems that girls face.

As for my curiosity about what it means to be a girl activist: I came away with the impression that it means living in two opposite worlds. All the girls are keenly aware of what it's like to have privileges and what it's like to face hardships. Gloria Samen sums it up with a story contrasting her life in the wealthy suburb of Potomac, Md., and her mom's girlhood in Cameroon.

On her first day as a high school senior, last September, Samen wanted to drive to school. "My mother was like, 'You can't take the car tomorrow because bla bla bla.' I was so annoyed. I had just got my license. She was like, 'Gloria, I walked four miles barefoot to get to school. I'd hold my shoes in my hand because I didn't want my shoes to get ruined in the mud because if your shoes are ruined, your uniform is not complete. You don't get to complain about not driving to school.' "

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

What Is Girl Up?

Founded: September 2010 Connections: It's a United Nations Foundation campaign, and it partners with the U.N. supporters, including active members, donors and people who follow Girl Up on social media. Reach: There are 271 clubs in the U.S. and 82 in other countries. Fundraising: The clubs have raised more than $100,000 since the organization started. Beneficiaries: Nearly 90 percent of the money goes to programs in the developing world that provide opportunities for girls; the remainder goes to general programs at the U.N. Foundation.

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

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