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Bring along the TED Radio Hour as your hiking pal. (iStock )

Playlist: Listens For A Long Hike

by NPR/TED Staff
Aug 28, 2014

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We made playlists of TED Radio Hour stories that will keep you curious about big ideas throughout the summer.

For your next hike, let the TED Radio Hour keep you company with these intriguing stories. TED speakers explore ideas about fear, privacy, and money while you explore the great outdoors.

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Barr Brothers. (Courtesy of the artist)

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Aug 28, 2014

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Heavy Rotation is a monthly sampler of public radio hosts' favorite songs. Check out past editions here.

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TED speakers, like behavioral economist Dan Ariely, share some curious ideas. (Courtesy of TED)

Playlist: Surprising Ideas

by NPR/TED Staff
Aug 28, 2014

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We made playlists of TED Radio Hour stories that will keep you curious about big ideas throughout the summer.

You'll look at the world in a different way after listening to these stories. This playlist includes TED speakers talking about where ideas come from, why we cheat, and how we perceive value.

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Kody Brown poses with his wives (from left) Janelle, Christine, Meri and Robyn in a promotional photo for TLC's reality TV show Sister Wives. (AP)

Federal Judge Strikes Down Part Of Utah's Polygamy Ban

by Eyder Peralta
Aug 28, 2014

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A federal judge on Wednesday finalized a ruling that strikes down part of Utah's ban on polygamy.

The case is high profile partly because the suit was brought forth by the Brown family, the stars of the TLC show Sister Wives. It's also important because as it works its way through the appeals process, it has the potential to become a landmark.

As the Salt Lake Tribune reads the decision, U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups says the part of the law that prohibits cohabitation between adults to whom they are not legally married violates both the First and 14th Amendments.

The paper adds:

"Utah law made such a union a felony punishable by up to five years in prison. Waddoups said the ban violated the First and 14th amendments to the Constitution.

"Waddoups let stand the portion of the statute that prevents someone from having more than one active marriage license.

"In the final portion of his ruling Wednesday, Waddoups found the Utah County Attorney Jeff Buhman violated the Browns' constitutional rights when he oversaw a 2010 investigation into whether the Brown family was committing bigamy. At the time the Browns lived in Lehi. They have since moved to Nevada. Buhman eventually decided not to file criminal charges, but Waddoups said the investigation stifled the Browns' rights to free speech, religion and equal protection."

The AP reports that the Utah attorney general is weighing whether to appeal the judge's decision.

In a blog post, the Brown family's lawyer, Jonathan Turley, said he hopes that the AG will not appeal the case. He said that Americans should not fear prosecution solely because of the structure of their family.

"Neither the Attorney General nor the state of Utah should fight a ruling that reaffirmed freedom of religion and equal protection," Turley wrote. "Utah is a state that was founded by citizens seeking those very rights against government abuse. Utah is a better place because of the courageous decision of Judge Waddoups and the commitment of the Brown family in defense of our Constitution."

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Josh Shaw of the USC Trojans. (Getty Images)

USC's Josh Shaw Suspended For Making Up Heroic Tale

by Eyder Peralta
Aug 28, 2014

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The University of Southern California has suspended cornerback Josh Shaw indefinitely after he admitted to fabricating a heroic tale that explained his sprained ankles.

CBS News reports:

Shaw has been suspended indefinitely from all of the Trojans' team activities after acknowledging his heroic tale was "a complete fabrication," the school announced in a statement Wednesday.

"The school didn't explain how Shaw actually was injured, but USC officials say they regret posting a story on their website Monday lauding Shaw's story about a second-story jump onto concrete to rescue his 7-year-old nephew.

" 'We are extremely disappointed in Josh,' USC coach Steve Sarkisian said. 'He let us all down. As I have said, nothing in his background led us to doubt him when he told us of his injuries, nor did anything after our initial vetting of his story.' "

Shaw originally said he jumped from a second-story balcony because his nephew was drowning. Shortly thereafter, Sarkisian said he received calls questioning the veracity of the tale.

Campus authorities investigated and by Wednesday night, Shaw released a statement.

"On Saturday August 23, 2014, I injured myself in a fall," Shaw said, according to CBS. "I made up a story about this fall that was untrue. I was wrong not to tell the truth. I apologize to USC for my action on this part.

"My USC coaches, the USC athletic department, and especially coach Sarkisian have all been supportive of me during my college career and for that, I am very grateful."

Even before Shaw admitted to his lie, there was lots of speculation of how exactly he was injured. That question still has no answer.

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