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A salmon fillet cooked sous vide, with miso-ginger glaze, gets a crisp finish under a broiler or torch flame. (T. Susan Chang for NPR)

Sous Vide Makes Its Way To The Home Kitchen

Apr 16, 2014

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Here's what you need to sous vide. Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon Sous Vide Basic Burger Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast is ideal for making chicken salad because of its smooth texture.

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T. Susan Chang

Sous vide. Not that long ago, it sounded so exotic — or, at least, so French. It was a phrase that belonged in restaurants, amid white tablecloths and flower arrangements and hushed conversations. Alternatively, it was a word that belonged to the modernist kitchens just beyond the swinging doors — kitchens filled with gleaming dehydrators and transglutaminase "meat glues" and spherification siphons and more.

I first heard it in the kitchen of now-famous Wylie Dufresne's first restaurant, 71 Clinton Fresh Food, where I was a clueless intern in the spring of 2000. There in New York City's still-scruffy Lower East Side, early hipsters with interesting facial hair waited the tables, while in back we fashioned fish crusts out of edamame. It was a forward-thinking place, yet no one even there imagined that the mysterious vacuum-and-water-bath technique chefs were whispering about would be part of many home cooks' arsenal in just 15 years.

What is sous vide anyway? Briefly, it's cooking "under vacuum" — i.e., in a vacuum-sealed bag — at a specific temperature. Usually, that means in a temperature-controlled water bath. Why would you want to do this? Because careful temperature control results in a kind of protein sorcery. You can get perfectly cooked delicate fish because it can't dry out or overflake. You can coax meats into meltingly soft braises because the protein never gets hot enough for the fibers to turn to string. You can get eggs that are never rubbery. You can melt the layers in pork belly without liquefying them in the process. You can even keep chocolate from losing its glossy temper when melted.

The exactness of the temperature allows you to be loosey-goosey with the time. No matter how long you hold a water bath at 155 degrees, it will never boil and toughen your chicken tenders. And you cannot accidentally toughen a filet mignon if it's just sitting there, relaxing, at 145 degrees. All in all, sous vide is a strange mix of the precise and the forgiving. It's the forgiving part that makes it a natural for home cooking.

But it's the precise part that scares people. At the dawn of home sous vide — a mere five or six years ago — you could buy an industrial thermal circulator to submerge in your water bath. It cost, oh, a mere $1,000. Then came the Sous Vide Supreme, an all-in-one unit that cut the cost in half. Or you could rig your own, using a rice cooker or slow cooker, a thermocouple and a temperature controller. There are wiring diagrams on the Web, and in books such as Jeff Potter's Cooking for Geeks.

Last December, having the urge but not the funds to sous vide, I brought one such diagram to my technically proficient spouse, with a pleading expression. He cocked an eyebrow and went back to shopping on Amazon. On Christmas Day, I found a Dorkfood Sous Vide Temperature Controller under the tree. All you had to do was plug it into your slow cooker, and it only cost $100. (Yes, you could buy a set of at least three cast iron skillets for that, but none of them will hold a water bath within 1 degree Fahrenheit ... forever.)

And the fact is, you don't even need to do that much. I have friends who cook steaks sous vide in foam beer coolers, keeping track of the temperature with an oven thermometer probe and adding some hot water from time to time. You don't even need a vacuum sealer — you can make do with heavy-duty Ziploc bags, as long as you've displaced the water out. (You do that by slowly lowering the bag into your water bath, so the pressure of the water squeezes the air out, and then you seal it the usual way).

There is, of course, the question of food safety. Maybe you've heard the stories about city health department officials forcing chefs to pour bleach on their sous vide meats. It's a story that always makes me want to cry, but for years public health has relied on a firm food safety rule: dangerous germs live at between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Even the pink interior of a medium-rare burger falls above this range, and most cooking techniques take place around or well above the boiling point of water (212 degrees F).

But not sous vide, whose finesse depends on letting some proteins denature while leaving others be. For example, if you're cooking a beef braise, you want chewy myosin fibers to relax, which happens by the time you reach 130 degrees. Collagen dissolves, for that velvety mouth feel, around 141 degrees. But actin fibers tighten at 150 degrees, squeezing out moisture and resulting in that ropy, dry texture we know all too well. Aiming for that window — above 140 degrees for safety, below 150 degrees for texture — isn't hard if you're set up to control temperature within a degree or two. And you can pasteurize your protein by holding it there for long enough.

Once you've reassured yourself that you're not taking your life (or at least your gut microbiome) into your hands, there's really just one more question, and it tends to come up when you're dealing with red meats. How can I get that beautiful brown caramelized meat-crust I love so much when my food's been soaking in a plastic bag? The answer is, pretty much the usual way — by searing it with a hot flame. You can sear it before, or you can sear it after. You can use a skillet or a broiler or a grill. Personally, I prefer a blowtorch — the kind of Bernzomatic propane torch you get at the hardware store for under $20 (although if you want to spend twice as much, you can get one of those cute little torches people get for finishing their creme brulee).

There's something fine and fearless about holding 20,000 BTU in one hand. It inspires a kind of spiral of confidence — the kind of confidence that comes from knowledge. I'm not afraid of cooking meat! I'm not afraid of unfamiliar gear! I'm not afraid of food poisoning! And I am not afraid to wield this blowtorch, with a wineglass in my other hand!

And I definitely will never, ever have to worry about rubbery, overcooked meats again. Thanks to sous vide, neither will you. (But still, do mind your eyebrows while you're holding that blowtorch.)

One's first glance at a sous vide recipe tends to be underwhelming, because sous vide is a technique that depends on measurement, rather than a series of specific actions and instructions. I've included here a few introductory recipes for getting started with basic sous vide. However, how you choose to set up your sous vide is a matter of personal taste. Some options: the Sous Vide Supreme, the Dorkfood DSV Temperature Controller or simply a digital probe thermometer and a foam cooler.

You can do just fine without a vacuum sealer, but if you want one, Foodsaver offers many popular models.


Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon

Salmon is a perfect protein on which to test your newfound control. You can practically see the transition from translucent to opaque as you raise it degree by degree. You could simply adorn it with a slick of butter, but I especially like this miso glaze.

Makes 1 generous serving

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon sugar

8 ounces salmon fillet, pin bones removed

1/2 teaspoon miso

1/2 teaspoon grated ginger

1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon honey

1 tablespoon tamari

1 tablespoon mirin

Dissolve the salt and sugar in 1 cup of warm water, pour into a zip-top bag, add the salmon and seal. Allow the salmon to sit in this brine in the refrigerator as you bring the water bath of your sous vide up to your target temperature (115 for rare, 120 for medium-rare).

When the water bath has reached the target temperature, remove any excess air from the zip-top bag by displacement if you're not using a vacuum-sealed bag. Drop the salmon into the bath. It should take about 1/2 hour to come to temperature.

Meanwhile, make the glaze: Combine the miso, ginger, oil, honey, tamari and mirin in a small saucepan. Whisk as you heat the glaze until it bubbles and thickens slightly, without charring in the pan at all.

Remove the cooked salmon from its bag, pat dry and place skin side down on a fireproof surface covered with foil (a baking sheet works well). Liberally apply the glaze and set it with a propane blowtorch turned up just shy of full blast. Alternatively, you can run the glazed fish under the broiler. Don't take longer than a minute for either technique, so you retain the luscious, just-cooked texture of the interior.


Sous Vide Pork Belly

Pork belly is one of those cuts that melt so beautifully when you braise them, it's hard to imagine it could be even more succulent if only you could cook it 75 degrees lower than the usual simmer. And yet it is. Cooked at 144 degrees for two days, the lean meat fibers sandwiched between the layers of fat stay plump and juicy.

The technique and sauce are adapted from Nathan Myhrvold's seminal Modernist Cuisine at Home (The Cooking Lab, 2012), which is invaluable to any sous vide adventurer. The Korean chili paste you can find in Korean markets, but other chili pastes will also work.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

1 1/2 pounds pork belly, cut into 1-inch chunks

1/2 cup Korean fermented chili paste

1/3 cup sugar

5 teaspoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons shaoxing cooking wine

1 1/2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced ginger

The target temperature of the water bath is 144 degrees. Seal the pork belly chunks in a gallon zip-top bag, displacing the air (or use a vacuum sealer), drop in the bath and cook for 48 hours.

Combine the remaining ingredients in a saucepan, warming gently and whisking to blend.

When the pork belly is finished, lay the chunks on a fireproof surface covered with foil (a baking sheet works well). Liberally apply the glaze and set it with a propane blowtorch turned up just shy of full blast. Alternatively, you can run the glazed chunks under the broiler. But the torch allows you to turn and evenly coat each side of the pork.


Sous Vide Basic Burger

The basic idea behind this recipe comes from Wicked Good Burgers (Fair Winds, 2013), whose "Fifth Dimension" seasoning powder turns out to be very close to the seasoning I've always used for burgers. Doneness in a sous vide burger is very evenly distributed from one side to the other, so rather than having a crusty exterior, a thick chewy layer and then a soft pinkish interior, you have a uniformly pinkish interior and a thin layer of meat crust — no chewy gray layer. (I'm using medium-rare just as an example.) There's virtue in both a sous vide and a regular burger. But the sous vide burger is much more predictable.

Makes 4 servings

2 pounds ground chuck

1/4 cup dried porcini mushrooms, ground in a spice or coffee grinder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

Vegetable oil for the skillet

Mix the raw beef, mushroom powder, garlic powder, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper together evenly with a fork. Gently form into 8 patties. Pack 2 at a time in a single layer in a zip-top quart bag, or seal in plastic using a vacuum sealer. Freeze for about an hour.

Bring the water bath up to 120 for rare, 125 for medium-rare. Drop the bagged frozen patties in the bath (displacing any air pockets first); the meat will take about 1 1/2 hours to get to its target temperature.

Once the hamburgers reach the desired doneness, remove them from the bags and pat dry. Heat a heavy skillet or grill pan over high heat until a wisp of smoke appears, add enough oil to coat the base, and sear the burgers for a minute on each side. (Sear in two batches if necessary.) Serve as you normally like your burgers — with toasted buns or caramelized onions or condiments, or the works.


Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast

You can really use any herb combination here, as long as you use liberal amounts and crush them to release the flavor. You can use the chicken breast for sandwiches, in chicken salad or give it a sear and eat it as is. (It's ideal for chicken salad because of the smooth, perfectly even texture).

Makes 2 to 4 servings, depending on how you use it

1 clove garlic

3 or 4 sprigs tarragon

1 boneless, skinless chicken breast (2 breast halves), about 1 pound.

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Bring the sous vide water bath up to 140 degrees. Crush the garlic and tarragon sprigs together lightly with the side of a knife or in a mortar and pestle. Place the garlic and herbs, along with the oil, chicken and salt, in a zip-top bag. Massage briefly to distribute the seasonings.

Seal the bag and place it in the bath. You'll need 1 to 1 1/2 hours to cook the chicken to the target temperature.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

About The Author

T. Susan Chang regularly reviews cookbooks for The Boston Globe, NPR.org and the cookbook-indexing website Eat Your Books. She's the author of A Spoonful of Promises: Recipes and Stories From a Well-Tempered Table and has just released the CookShelf cookbook-rating app, which is available on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. For more information, visit her blog, Cookbooks for Dinner.

Get recipes for Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon, Sous Vide Pork Belly, Sous Vide Basic Burger and Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast.

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Men pray on the street before the start of the American Muslim Day Parade in 2010 in New York. (Getty Images)

NYPD Shuts Down Controversial Unit That Spied On Muslims

Apr 15, 2014

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The New York Police Department said Tuesday it would disband a special unit charged with detecting possible terrorist threats by carrying out secret surveillance of Muslim groups.

The squad that conducted the surveillance, known as the Demographics Unit, was formed in 2003. It brought the NYPD under fire from community groups and activists who accused the force of abusing civil rights and profiling.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said his administration has promised "a police force that keeps our city safe, but that is also respectful and fair.

"This reform is a critical step forward in easing tensions between the police and the communities they serve, so that our cops and our citizens can help one another go after the real bad guys," he said.

The Associated Press says:

"The program relied on plainclothes officers to eavesdrop on people in bookstores, restaurants and mosques. The tactic was detailed in a series of stories by The Associated Press and became the subject of two federal lawsuits."

Police reportedly had "systematically spied on Muslim neighborhoods, listened in on sermons, infiltrated colleges and photographed law-abiding residents as part of a broad effort to watch communities where terror cells might operate. Individuals and groups were monitored even when there was no evidence they were linked to terrorism or crime," the AP says.

The New York Times says:

"To many Muslims ... the Demographics Unit ... was a sign that the police viewed their every action with suspicion. The police mapped communities inside and outside the city, logging where customers in traditional Islamic clothes ate meals and documenting their lunch-counter conversations.

" 'The Demographics Unit created psychological warfare in our community,' said Linda Sarsour, of the Arab American Association of New York. 'Those documents, they showed where we live. That's the cafe where I eat. That's where I pray. That's where I buy my groceries. They were able to see their entire lives on those maps. And it completely messed with the psyche of the community.' "

Even so, as recently as February, a federal judge in Newark threw out a suit brought against the NYPD by eight Muslims living in the New Jersey community.

The judge wrote that "the police could not have monitored New Jersey for Muslim terrorist activities without monitoring the Muslim community itself."

Ultimately, the years of surveillance proved fruitless and "the police acknowledged that it never generated a lead," the Times says.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

About The Author

T. Susan Chang regularly reviews cookbooks for The Boston Globe, NPR.org and the cookbook-indexing website Eat Your Books. She's the author of A Spoonful of Promises: Recipes and Stories From a Well-Tempered Table and has just released the CookShelf cookbook-rating app, which is available on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. For more information, visit her blog, Cookbooks for Dinner.

Get recipes for Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon, Sous Vide Pork Belly, Sous Vide Basic Burger and Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
An Indian eunuch in the eastern city of Bhubaneswar dances Tuesday to celebrate the Supreme Court's ruling recognizing a third gender category. (AP)

In India, Landmark Ruling Recognizes Transgender Citizens

Apr 15, 2014

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India now has a third gender.

The Supreme Court has recognized the country's transgender community as being in a third neutral category — neither male nor female.

In handing down the ruling, Justice K.S. Radhakrishnan said, "Transgenders are citizens of this country ... and recognition as a third gender is not a social or medical issue but a human rights issue."

Article 15 of India's Constitution guarantees that no state can discriminate against citizens on the basis of religion, caste, race or sex.

The decision by the two-judge bench applies to what in India are traditionally known by the Hindi word hijras. The term is loosely used to include eunuchs and transvestites. The court stated, "transgender is generally described as an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression or behavior does not conform to their biological sex."

Activists say because the transgender population has not been legally recognized, its members have been ostracized, abused and forced into prostitution. Many eke out an existence as sex workers or beggars.

India's hijras are easily spotted on the street and can be found wending their way through traffic at intersections, clad in colorful saris and bright lipstick. They tap on car windows, begging or sometimes demanding a bit of change.

Estimated to number between 2 and 3 million, they have long been a prominent but marginalized part of Indian culture.

Hijras are deprived of jobs, education and health care; turned away at hospitals, limited by the practice of male and female wards. India had taken steps to ensure their recognition when India's Election Commission earlier allowed a third gender of "other" on voter registration forms for the national elections now taking place.

But the Supreme Court on Tuesday expressed concern over transgenders being harassed in society and said "it was the right of every human being to choose their gender."

It directed the government to bring them into the mainstream, ordering it to set aside quotas for jobs and education for transgender individuals, bringing them in line with the benefits already afforded other minority groups and lower castes. The court said hijras will be entitled to "all other rights," including passports, voter cards and driving licenses.

The prominent transgender activist Laxmi Narayan Tripathi initially brought the suit in 2012 seeking equal rights. She said the decision was hard-won in this traditionally conservative country. "Today, I feel a proud citizen of India," Tripathi said.

But while the court has declared discrimination against the transgender community illegal, whether the practice will end is far from certain. Formidable obstacles remain in the way sexuality is perceived in India.

As recently as December, India's Supreme Court reinstated a ban on gay sex, a colonial-era law dating back to 1861. The widely criticized decision reversed the Delhi High Court, which had ruled the law prohibiting "carnal intercourse against the laws of nature" an infringement of fundamental rights. But the Supreme Court justices said the provision would hold until Parliament chose to amend it, as it was a matter left for legislators and not the judiciary.

Amnesty International praised Tuesday's ruling as reaffirming "constitutional values of inclusion and equality" but said it "should provide the impetus for a new government to repeal" what it called the "absurd law" criminalizing sex between consenting same-sex partners.

Religious groups across India said the Supreme Court's December ruling ought to be respected. A senior leader with the Hindu-nationalist BJP party argued that overturning it would be illegal, immoral and against the ethos of the Indian culture.

With polls predicting the BJP, the country's main opposition party, on the verge of coming to power, transgender activists are not letting down their guard. They say the battle today may have been won, but the war is far from over.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

About The Author

T. Susan Chang regularly reviews cookbooks for The Boston Globe, NPR.org and the cookbook-indexing website Eat Your Books. She's the author of A Spoonful of Promises: Recipes and Stories From a Well-Tempered Table and has just released the CookShelf cookbook-rating app, which is available on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. For more information, visit her blog, Cookbooks for Dinner.

Get recipes for Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon, Sous Vide Pork Belly, Sous Vide Basic Burger and Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Herbie Hancock speaks at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Induction Ceremony 2013 at Harvard University. The JJA awarded the pianist with a Lifetime Achievement Award on Tuesday. (Getty Images)

Jazz Journalists Association Recognizes Its Musicians Of The Year

by Patrick Jarenwattananon
Apr 15, 2014

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Reported by

Patrick Jarenwattananon

Longtime friends and collaborators Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter headline the winners of the 2014 JJA Jazz Awards for musical achievement, which were announced today.

The awards, annually nominated and voted upon by members of the Jazz Journalists Association, recognize individual musicians, ensembles and recordings of the calendar year 2013. (I did not vote this year.) Hancock's prize was the exception: The pianist and composer received the Lifetime Achievement in Jazz Award. Shorter, the saxophonist and composer who turned 80 last year, was named Musician of the Year; his live album Without A Net was also named Record of the Year, and his quartet was the Midsize Ensemble of the Year. A complete list of winners is available online.

Many of the awards went to well-established artists, including composer and bandleader Maria Schneider (who won in several categories), trumpeter Terence Blanchard, trombonist Roswell Rudd, saxophonist Joe Lovano, violinist Regina Carter and guitarist Bill Frisell. Some newer faces did emerge, notably 24-year-old vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant, who won both Female Singer of the Year and Up-And-Coming Artist of the Year.

The JJA will pass out the awards to the winning musicians at public performances. Its awards for journalism and media will be announced at a ceremony in June. A Blog Supreme is nominated in the Blog of the Year category.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

About The Author

T. Susan Chang regularly reviews cookbooks for The Boston Globe, NPR.org and the cookbook-indexing website Eat Your Books. She's the author of A Spoonful of Promises: Recipes and Stories From a Well-Tempered Table and has just released the CookShelf cookbook-rating app, which is available on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. For more information, visit her blog, Cookbooks for Dinner.

Get recipes for Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon, Sous Vide Pork Belly, Sous Vide Basic Burger and Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Xanax and Valium, prescribed to treat anxiety, mood disorders and insomnia, can be deadly when mixed with other sedatives. (Flickr)

Risks Of Popular Anxiety Drugs Often Overshadowed

Apr 15, 2014 (All Things Considered / Maine Public Broadcasting Network)

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Sayra Small, with her son, Holden. Small is now in recovery after an addiction to benzodiazepines and opioid painkillers. Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon Sous Vide Basic Burger Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast is ideal for making chicken salad because of its smooth texture.

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When actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died of an overdose in February, the New York City medical examiner ruled that his death was the result of "acute mixed drug intoxication." Heroin, cocaine and a widely prescribed class of drugs known as benzodiazepines, or benzos, were found in his system.

The drugs first burst onto the scene in the 1950s and '60s and quickly became known as "mother's little helper," the mild tranquilizer that could soothe frazzled housewives' nerves. More than four decades later, benzos — including Valium, Xanax, Klonopin and Ativan — are used to treat anxiety, mood disorders and insomnia.

Dr. Michael Kelley, the medical director of the behavioral department at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, Maine, says he doesn't go a single day without seeing somebody addicted to them.

He says when he first took the job 15 years ago, about 75 percent of the detox patients were alcoholics, and the rest were drug addicts. Now, he says, 90 percent of them are drug addicts whose drugs of choice often include the combined use of opiates and benzos; both are sedatives that can slow respiration.

"It's actually pretty rare to see somebody only using only one," he says — and that's incredibly dangerous.

"Benzodiazepines and the opiates both can cause death when you take too much of them," he adds. "But they potentiate each other — they make each other stronger. And so one plus one doesn't equal two; it equals three or four."

Sayra Small says that in her early 20s, it was easy to find a doctor willing to prescribe benzos for her anxiety. She loved them because they worked so well. "It makes it so you have no problem," she says. "I mean the house could burn down and you'd just sit there saying, OK, this is all right."

The problem was, she was also addicted to prescription painkillers and heroin. And pretty soon, Small says, she was dependent on benzos, too.

"When you first start using opiates you instantly get the rush. Well, for me, I loved the rush but that wasn't about it. It was the feeling afterwards of just feeling so content. Lots of people call it 'the nod,' " she says. "And that stops happening after a while just using opiates. So, it's the benzos and opiates together that still produce that nod. It feels very easy when you're feeling that way, too, like you could just slip away."

Small almost did slip away. She says she overdosed several times before getting into recovery — but she was lucky. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the combination of benzos and opioids contribute to about 30 percent of opioid-related deaths.

Small ended up in the care of Dr. Mark Publicker, an addiction specialist with the Mercy Recovery Center in Westbrook, Maine. He says he thinks the risks associated with benzos have been overshadowed by the prescription opioid epidemic.

"They do produce a strong, physical dependence that can create life-threatening withdrawal seizures and other consequences, but I think that the perception that they're harmful is low," he says.

Small learned that the hard way. She says her detox for benzos was far more difficult than it was for the opioid painkillers she was also abusing. "I mean, I couldn't move, I couldn't eat. I don't want to say anything too graphic, but anything you had came out one end or the other.

"But emotionally," she says, "you just feel stripped. You feel naked to the world."

Now 34, Small has been in recovery for a couple of years. She still gets anxious but says she's learned to deal with life on her own terms, without relying on the medications she thought were her friends.

Copyright 2014 Maine Public Broadcasting Network. To see more, visit http://www.mainepublicradio.org/.

About The Author

T. Susan Chang regularly reviews cookbooks for The Boston Globe, NPR.org and the cookbook-indexing website Eat Your Books. She's the author of A Spoonful of Promises: Recipes and Stories From a Well-Tempered Table and has just released the CookShelf cookbook-rating app, which is available on iPhone, iPad and Android devices. For more information, visit her blog, Cookbooks for Dinner.

Get recipes for Sous Vide Miso-Ginger Salmon, Sous Vide Pork Belly, Sous Vide Basic Burger and Sous Vide Herbed All-Purpose Chicken Breast.

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