Skip Navigation
NPR News
Author and illustrator Theodor Seuss Geisel, known as Dr. Seuss, reads from his book Horton Hears a Who! to 4-year-old Lucinda Bell at his home in La Jolla, Calif., in 1956. (AP)

Book News: 'Lost' Dr. Seuss Stories To Be Published

by Annalisa Quinn
Aug 1, 2014

Share this


The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • "He climbed. He grew dizzy. His ankles grew numb. But he climbed and he climbed and he clum and he clum." Random House Kids is coming out with a collection of forgotten Dr. Seuss stories that were published in midcentury magazines. Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories will be released in September. Random House describes the book: "This follow-up to The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories features familiar Seussian faces and places — including Horton the Elephant, Marco, Mulberry Street, and a Grinch — as well as an introduction by renowned Seuss scholar Charles D. Cohen. Seuss fans will learn more about Horton's integrity, Marco's amazing imagination, a narrowly avoided disaster on Mullbery Street, and a devious Grinch."
  • HarperCollins says it will cut parts of a book that caused former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura to sue the estate of late author Chris Kyle for defamation. Kyle's book American Sniper alleges that Kyle punched Ventura after the former governor and pro-wrestler commented that the Navy SEALs "deserve to lose a few" in Iraq. On Tuesday, a jury awarded Ventura almost $2 million.
  • For The New York Review of Books, Hilton Als writes about Flannery O'Connor's "gorgeous soul sickness — her various judgments and hurts and desire to know and love her ever-mysterious Lord in what appeared to be a God-forsaken world."
  • The poet and critic Stephen Burt is interviewed in The Adroit Journal: "Poetry for me is its own end, its own aim — but individual poems can also, as horses take riders, have other aims too. You can write a poem to redefine romantic love, or attack (or even advocate!) imperialism, or undermine the tradition of all-too-simple protest poems, or classify types of upstate New York snow."
  • "I glanced furtively around to check that no one was watching and prepared to scale the wall." — Douglas Field on breaking into James Baldwin's house.
Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

With Final Broadcast, 'Tell Me More' Bids Farewell

by Alan Greenblatt
Aug 1, 2014

See this

Michel Martin speaks with Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado by phone for Tell Me More.

Share this


After seven years, NPR's Tell Me More is going off the air on Friday.

The final program can be heard on member stations and will be live-streamed on this page, beginning at 11 a.m. ET. It will include the show's popular Barbershop roundtable, a political chat, a discussion of faith and a live musical performance.

The show has focused on issues of particular — though by no means exclusive — concern to African Americans and other people of color. Host Michel Martin made it a point to interview not just newsmakers and policy analysts but everyday people who shared both their stories and perspective on matters ranging from poverty to parenting.

After one segment aired about a woman who struggled to get her children across town to school following her separation from her husband, "for weeks afterward people stopped me on the street to tell me how it haunted them," Michel recalled in a recent essay for National Journal.

NPR announced in May that it was canceling the show, which drew a fair amount of criticism. Leslie Alexander of Fulton, Md., spoke for many disappointed listeners when she wrote to NPR's ombudsman that "Tell Me More is the only show I know of that features 'minority" stories as just regular stories.....Where else can you hear a discussion about the issues of the day and the panelists are from four or five different ethnic or racial groups but no one is expected to be the spokesperson for their ethnicity or race?"

Michel and Carline Watson, the program's executive producer, will remain with NPR as part of its new Identity and Culture Unit, which will help incorporate broader coverage of issues such as race, faith, gender and family online, at public events and in the network's flagship newsmagazines.

Listeners and contributors have been sharing stories and tweeting photos this week about their determination to stick with Michel on NPR and on Twitter. In her last "Can I Just Tell You" essay for Tell Me More, Michel said that the job of telling the stories of people often ignored by the media is far from finished.

"There's still a pie out there, many stories yet to tell," Michel wrote. "We are going to keep looking for those."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

How To Mark 10 Years Of Co-Hosting 'Morning Edition'? Take A Break!

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

See this

Michel Martin speaks with Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado by phone for Tell Me More.

Hear this

This text will be replaced
Launch in player

Share this


Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

Everyone Goes To The Store To Get Milk. So Why's It Way In The Back?

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

See this

Michel Martin speaks with Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado by phone for Tell Me More.

Hear this

This text will be replaced
Launch in player

Share this


Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Host Michel Martin poses in the Tell Me More studio at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Although the show is ending, Michel says there are "many stories yet to tell." (NPR)

Pa. Man's Parting Message: 'Please Don't Email Me, I'm Dead'

Aug 1, 2014 (Morning Edition)

See this

Michel Martin speaks with Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado by phone for Tell Me More.

Hear this

This text will be replaced
Launch in player

Share this


Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.