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Men -- it's time to take a hard look at your pant size. Many American men buy pants that are too small. (iStockphoto)

The Average American Man Is Too Big For His Britches

by Serri Graslie
Jul 25, 2014

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Serri Graslie

When my colleague Viet Le started writing about his struggle to find clothing that fits him as an "extra-small" man in a world that idolizes "big and tall," I was intrigued — and a bit confused.

Viet has never struck me as an especially small guy. At 5 feet 6 inches tall and 128 pounds, is he really that far out of the mainstream?

Well, according to 2010 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the measurements of the average American man:

Height: 5 feet 7 inches (69.3 inches)
Weight: 195.5 pounds
Waist circumference: 39.7 inches

So yes, Viet is exceptional by American standards. Artist Nickolay Lamm has modeled what this hypothetical average man might look like, comparing him with other regular guys from across the world.

If he were wearing pants, you might think our average Joe would be in a size 38, 39 or 40, depending on the cut. But, turns out, the top-selling pant/trouser size in the U.S. is actually a 34.

That information comes from Edward Gribbin, president of the clothing size and fit consulting firm Alvanon. His company has body-scanned over 400,000 people across the world and has access to sales-by-size figures for major U.S. retailers.

"Of the guys who actually have a waist close to the average (between, say, 38 to 40 inches), the highest percentage buy size 34 pants (close to 55 percent), followed by size 36 (about 35 percent). Only a very small percentage buy size 38," he explained in an email.

Where does the major discrepancy come from? A few places. For one, "vanity sizing" — where the actual size of a garment is bigger than advertised in an effort to flatter you — is not just for women anymore. Gribbin says the waist measurement in a man's pant is generally 1.5 to 2 inches larger than the stated size. (Or up to 5 inches, if you're shopping at Old Navy.)

Secondly, guys with a waist bigger than 35 to 36 inches tend to have a prominent belly, Gribbin says. The more it sticks out, the lower men wear their pants.

"They can wear a smaller size, and though the belly hanging over is not the most attractive sight, most men don't care," Gribbin says.

Finally, there may be a certain amount of stubbornness at play. Gribbin says men don't intentionally "buy a smaller size for reasons of vanity" — they just continue to grab the size that they've always bought.

"They are more creatures of habit, and if they wore size 34 as a younger man, they just continue to buy that size ('their size') even after they've gained 10, 15, 20 pounds," he says.

So gentlemen, take some of the advice they've been dishing out to women forever — ignore what the tag says, try it on and buy what truly fits. Dress for the body you have, not the body you think you have. Or want.

Serri Graslie is a producer for All Things Considered and NPR.org

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A fence surrounds the state prison in Florence, Ariz., where Joseph Rudolph Wood was put to death on Wednesday. The execution process took nearly two hours. (AP)

Are Opponents Of The Death Penalty Contributing To Its Problems?

Jul 25, 2014

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Kevin Cooper was convicted of murdering a married couple and two children, and was sentenced to die.

That was back in 1985. Cooper is still awaiting execution on California's death row.

San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos, who is handling the case, blames the long delay on Cooper's multiple appeals in state and federal courts.

"This is all a big strategic plan to really manipulate the system to attack capital punishment, not just in California, but in the United States," Ramos says.

The death penalty is under considerable pressure, both from court decisions and a series of problematic executions, including one this week in Arizona. Six states have abolished the death penalty over the past seven years.

Death penalty supporters such as Ramos say this is no accident. They believe opponents intentionally toss sand in the gears of the execution process, and then complain that the system doesn't work.

"It's a delaying tactic that then allows them to scream it's unconstitutional because it's been delayed too long," Ramos says.

Defense attorneys dismiss this as nonsense. The problems with the death penalty, they say, were not created by its opponents.

"It's not the defense attorneys who are holding executions up," says Deborah Denno, a law professor at Fordham University. "Not by a long shot."

Blame For Delays

Last week, U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney found California's system of capital punishment unconstitutional because executions are delayed for too long and are "arbitrary" in terms of which condemned prisoners are ever actually executed.

Death penalty supporters argue that it's the killers — and their attorneys — causing most of the delays.

"Having done everything they can to cause the problem, they decry the problem," says Kent Scheidegger, legal director of the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation in Sacramento, which defends victims' rights.

But many of the delays aren't caused by defense attorneys, rather the very lack of them, Denno says. In California, it can take years for a condemned prisoner even to be appointed counsel, and years more to wait for what is known as a post-conviction hearing.

"Even before a case gets to federal court, there's often more than 10 years of delays built into the system that don't have anything to do with what's brought from the defense," says Joseph Luby, an attorney with the Death Penalty Litigation Clinic in Kansas City, Mo., which defends the condemned.

In the California case, Carney specifically looked at delays that were the fault of the state, not of the prisoner.

"What the judge expressly said, and what the defendant assumed as his burden of proof, was that the specific delays weren't this defendant's fault," says Franklin Zimring, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley. "That was something the condemned man had to prove before he could get a remedy based on the delays."

Problems With Lethal Injection

In addition to traditional questions regarding innocence and adequacy of counsel, defense attorneys now will typically challenge a state's method of execution. Lethal injections, which for years had a more anodyne reputation than gas chambers or the electric chair, have become problematic in and of themselves.

"Botched lethal injection executions have offered the same kind of negative publicity as other methods," Zimring says.

Scheidegger, the foundation attorney, says death penalty opponents, having successfully promoted lethal injections at the expense of older methods by portraying it as more humane, are now undermining states' use of drugs through their legal challenges.

Drugmakers in European countries that have abolished the death penalty are also blocking U.S. states from using their products in executions.

"There is an inherent tension here," NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg said on All Things Considered. "The more pressure there is to do this the right way from anti-death penalty lawyers, the more secretive states get because they can't actually carry out their mandate in the most humane way anymore."

But Denno, the Fordham professor, says there were problems with lethal injections long before states ran out of their preferred barbiturates.

"Botched executions have existed from the very beginning [of the use of lethal injection], since 1982," she says.

Scrambling For A Solution

Denno notes that the dosage of the sedative midazolam, which many states are now using for executions, has ranged from 10 milligrams to 500 milligrams.

"One state has a botched execution, so they use more or less of the drug because they don't know what's causing the problems," she says. "Every time there's a problem, states have a little bit more of a challenge saying why they would ever use midazolam again, when it has such a bad record."

But if states seem to be improvising in terms of method — and doing their best to keep the sources of their drugs secret — that's at least in part because they know they're almost certain to face a legal challenge, suggests Robert Blecker, a professor at New York Law School.

"I've been at national and international conferences, as the lone death penalty supporter, where devout abolitionists openly exhort each other to gum up the works and delay," he says.

Luby says defense appeals aren't frivolous but rather serious attempts at making sure the irrevocable death penalty is carried out justly and properly. He notes that many sentences are vacated on appeal and contends that challenges against lethal injection have been vindicated by the many problems seen just this year.

In the Arizona case, the Supreme Court had lifted the stay of execution granted by an appellate court based on death row inmate Joseph Wood's right to know more the state's drug sources and methodology.

"One can only hope that the courts, including the Supreme Court, will have a bit of buyer's remorse about having accepted the state's argument, based on what we've seen," Luby says.

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill. (AP)

Sen. John McCain Calls Lengthy Execution In Arizona 'Torture'

by Eyder Peralta
Jul 25, 2014

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Sen. John McCain, a Republican from Arizona, says the execution of Joseph Rudolph Wood, which took nearly two hours, amounted to torture.

Politico reports:

"The longtime Republican lawmaker, who experienced years of torture while being held in captivity by the North Vietnamese during the Vietnam War, called the drawn-out lethal injection execution of Joseph Wood on Wednesday 'terrible.'

" 'I believe in the death penalty for certain crimes. But that is not an acceptable way of carrying it out. And people who were responsible should be held responsible,' he said in an interview. 'The lethal injection needs to be an indeed lethal injection and not the bollocks-upped situation that just prevailed. That's torture.' "

As Bill reported, there are different interpretations of what happened on Wednesday. Wood's lawyer said that he watched his client gasp and snort for more than an hour after a lethal mix of drugs was injected into his body.

Family members of Debra Dietz and her father, Eugene Dietz, who Wood shot to death, said his execution was "nothing."

Arizona's Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Zick told a judge that Wood's reported gasping was an involuntary reaction, and that Wood was "effectively brain-dead" when that happened.

Gov. Jan Brewer did not cast judgment on the process, but she ordered a full review of it, and any further executions in the state have been halted pending the result of that review.

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As Market Basket Store Shelves Empty, Online Presence Grows

Jul 25, 2014 (Here & Now / WBUR-FM)

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It’s been a big week for Market Basket.

For a window into everything about this family-owned business that has been successful — despite deep divisions at the top — you just have to go online.From our own WBUR to Buzzfeed, countless publications are writing about the New England grocery store chain’s ongoing employee protests and resulting empty shelves.

Butin this case, the curious now have another potential source for information on the company. Unlike most large companies, last week Market Basket didn’t have an official web site. Now, things have changed.

Curt NickischfromHere & Nowcontributing stationWBURhas the strange story of the $4-billion company and the lone shopper who stepped into its online void.

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Market Basket Employees Protest Labor Changes

Jul 25, 2014 (Here & Now / WBUR-FM)

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At a New England grocery store, employees are protesting labor changes — but it’s not what you’re expecting. Market Basket’s 25,000 employeesdon’t have a problem withtheir own working conditions. Rather,they want ousted CEO Arthur T. Demoulas put back in his position.

In 1994, Demoulas’s father foughthis late brother’s heirsfor control of thefamily business. Demoulas’s uncle’s heirs wona very slight majority stake of 50.5 percent. However, when company control passed to the next generation, Demoulas’s cousin — confusingly named Arthur S. Demoulas — was not named CEO. The board chose Arthur T.

Last July, one board member switched her allegiance, giving Arthur S. majority influence. At his urging,late last month the board voted to fire Arthur T.and replacehim with co-CEOsFelicia Thornton and James Gooch.

Now, Market Basket employees have vowednot to stock store shelves until the boardrestoresArthur T. — whom they call the “good Arthur” — as CEO.

Boston Globe columnist Steve Syre joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the family feud and why the Market Basket workers are so loyal to Arthur T.

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