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"It's about being here in the moment, accepting one another and allowing creativity to flow." - Stefon Harris (TED)

Are There Mistakes In Jazz?

by NPR/TED Staff
Mar 30, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Making Mistakes.

About Stefon Harris' TEDTalk

What is a mistake? By going through examples with his improvisational jazz quartet, Stefon Harris gets to a profound truth: many actions are perceived as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately.

About Stefon Harris

Stefon Harris' passionate artistry, energetic stage presence and astonishing virtuosity have propelled him into the forefront of the current jazz scene. Widely recognized and lauded by both his peers and jazz critics, Harris is committed to exploring the rich potential of jazz composition and blazing trails on the vibraphone. He tours with his band Blackout and the San Francisco Jazz Collective, and he teaches at New York University. His TEDTalk was performed with Jamire Williams on drums, Burniss Travis on bass and Christian Sands on piano.

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"Thinking partners who aren't echo chambers. I wonder how many of us have, or dare to have, such collaborators." - Margaret Heffernan (TED)

Is Conflict Good For Progress?

by NPR/TED Staff
Mar 11, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Making Mistakes.

About Margaret Heffernan's TEDTalk

Most people instinctively avoid conflict, but Margaret Heffernan says good disagreement is central to progress. She argues the best partners aren't echo chambers, and how great teams, relationships and businesses allow people to deeply disagree.

About Margaret Heffernan

The former CEO of five businesses, Margaret Heffernan explores the all-too-human thought patterns — like conflict avoidance and selective blindness — that lead managers and organizations astray. How do organizations think? In her book, Willful Blindness, Margaret Heffernan examines why businesses and the people who run them often ignore the obvious — with consequences as dire as the global financial crisis and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

Heffernan began her career in television production, building a track record at the BBC before going on to run the film and television producer trade association, IPPA. In the U.S., Heffernan became a serial entrepreneur and CEO in the wild early days of Web business and was named one of the Internet's Top 100 by Silicon Alley Reporter in 1999.

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Brene Brown at TED2012. (TED)

Can We Gain Strength From Shame?

by NPR/TED Staff
Mar 11, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Making Mistakes.

About Brené Brown's TEDTalk

Shame is an unspoken epidemic, the secret behind many forms of broken behavior. Brené Brown studies vulnerability, courage, authenticity and shame. She discusses what can happen when people confront their shame head-on.

About Brené Brown

Brené Brown has spent the last 10 years studying vulnerability, courage, authenticity and shame. She spent the first five years of her decade-long study focusing on shame and empathy, and is now using that work to explore a concept that she calls "Wholeheartedness." She's a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, and the author of Daring Greatly!

Brown poses the questions: How do we learn to embrace our vulnerabilities and imperfections so that we can engage in our lives from a place of authenticity and worthiness? How do we cultivate the courage, compassion and connection that we need to recognize that we are enough — that we are worthy of love, belonging and joy?

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Brian Goldman speaking at TEDxToronto. (TED)

What Can Doctors Learn By Admitting Their Mistakes?

by NPR/TED Staff
Mar 11, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 1 of TED Radio Hour episode Making Mistakes.

About Brian Goldman's TEDTalk

Every doctor makes mistakes. But, says physician Brian Goldman, medicine's culture of denial keeps doctors from talking about and learning from those mistakes. Goldman calls on doctors to start talking about being wrong.

About Brian Goldman

Brian Goldman is an emergency room physician who has worked at Mount Sinai Hospital in downtown Toronto for more than 20 years. He's also a prominent medical journalist and the host of CBC Radio's White Coat, Black Art. In Dr. Goldman's first book, The Night Shift, published in 2010, he shares his experiences of working through the witching hours at Mount Sinai, as well as at the other hospitals where he has spent his long career.

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