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The Cure's Robert Smith. (Courtesy of the artist)

The Cure On World Cafe

Sep 2, 2014 (WXPN-FM)

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David Dye

The Cure was one of the first alternative bands to have huge commercial success in the 1980s, both in the U.K. and here in the states. Starting in 1979, the band released a trilogy of albums that established its popularity with those, who like lead singer Robert Smith, donned black garb and heavy eye makeup. Then came the hits: "Heaven," "Love Cats," Friday I'm In Love" and many others.

This Vintage Cafe goes back to 2008 when we had a chance to talk with Smith about the band's appeal and longevity. The on-stage performances from The Spectrum in Philadelphia include music from his 2008 album, 4:13 Dream, and classics from the past like "Boys Don't Cry" and "Just Like Heaven."

Copyright 2014 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

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Crow Moses. (Courtesy of the artist)

World Cafe Next: Crow Moses

Sep 2, 2014 (WXPN-FM)

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Chicago folk artist Crow Moses is a veteran of sorts in his city's music scene, but the name might not be familiar. That's because is upcoming album, Horse Heaven Hills, is the first title recorded under his own name. The experimental musician previously released albumsas Musikanto — Ghost Pain in 2009 and Sky of Dresses in 2011.

It's no wonder Moses wanted to go by his actual name on Horse Heaven Hills — there are some remarkably strong songs on this record. Listen to two of them in this World Cafe: Next segment.

Copyright 2014 WXPN-FM. To see more, visit http://www.xpn.org/.

Playlist

  • "Mad Horses"
  • "Horse Heaven Hills"

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Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Clockwise from upper left: Billy Corgan of The Smashing Pumpkins, Alaina Moore of Tennis, Gemma Ray, Ex Hex, Orenda Fink. (Courtesy of the artists)

New Mix: The Smashing Pumpkins, Tennis, Ex Hex, Gemma Ray, More

Sep 2, 2014 (WXPN-FM)

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We kick off this week's show with a moody rock romp from Ex Hex, a group based out of Washington, D.C., featuring Mary Timony (Helium, Wild Flag), Laura Harris and Betsy Wright. We follow with the mysterious voice of Gemma Ray, a deluxe reissue of a Smashing Pumpkins classic, the enchanting Icelandic singer lf Arnalds and more.

The Smashing Pumpkins reissue is the band's polarizing Adore. Originally released in 1998, some fans rejected the album for having more subdued moments and electronic textures than the group's earlier records. But now, more than 15 years later, many consider it a classic. The deluxe version has more than 100 tracks, including outtakes, demos and previously unheard songs. We play the opening cut, "To Sheila."

Also on the program: the ethereal sounds of Montreal-based singer Sea Oleena; Azure Ray's Orenda Fink is back with a new solo album, a sometimes haunting examination of death and dying and Denver-based pop duo Tennis pushes itself in new sonic directions with an album produced by Patrick Carney of The Black Keys, Jim Eno of Spoon and songwriter Richard Swift.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Playlist

  • "Mad Horses"
  • "Horse Heaven Hills"

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Members of the Ferguson Police Department wear their new body cameras during a rally Aug. 30, in Ferguson, Mo. (Getty Images)

Using Technology To Counter Police Mistrust Is Complicated

Sep 2, 2014 (WXPN-FM)

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Outfitting police officers with body cameras seems to be the most concrete solution to come out of the police misconduct accusations in the Ferguson, Mo. And the push for cameras extends far beyond the suburban Missouri police department — more than 153,000 people have signed a "We the People" petition to create a "Mike Brown Law" that would require all police to wear cameras.

Ferguson officers didn't have dashboard cameras for their vehicles, much less body cameras, when 18-year-old Michael Brown was fatally shot in August, or during the chaotic protests and crowd control that followed his death. But now, thanks to a donation by two security companies, the police department is outfitted with about 50 cameras, which were already used during a protest last week.

It follows a national trend toward using these cameras. They are particularly appealing in places where police distrust is high because of prior histories of misconduct.

The argument is that technology can curb officers from acting out of line and help counter police distrust in the community. NPR's Martin Kaste has reported extensively on the camera trend sweeping law enforcement agencies:

"In this job, we're frequently accused of things we haven't done, or things were kind of embellished, as far as contact," Bainbridge Island, Wash., officer Ben Sias told Kaste. "And the cameras show a pretty unbiased opinion of what actually did happen."

People do seem to act differently when they know they're being recorded, and the ACLU has argued that cameras act as an important check on the power of police. To wit, The Wall Street Journal reported that a recent Cambridge University study looked into a yearlong trial of cameras by the police department in Rialto, Calif., and found an 89 percent decline in the number of complaints against officers.

But this doesn't mean problems of not knowing what exactly happened between police officers and the people will disappear completely. Recordings aren't completely neutral, depending on when they started and stopped, the camera angle and perspective and many other variables. While these devices can provide much-needed accountability, how and when to use them often falls on the police departments. Tech entrepreneur Sean Bonner writes:

"In Los Angeles the LAPD (which has been trying to overcome an unfortunate reputation the department earned very publicly in 1991 with the Rodney King beating and the Rampart scandal a few years later) are required to wear voice recorders which switch on automatically when their cruiser sirens are activated and record voice audio within a certain range of the car once the officer steps outside. The benefit here is obvious and the argument was made that this would ensure accountability. Which it would if they worked, but mysteriously the recorders stopped working and this kept happening until the department was forced to admit that their internal investigations showed that officers were purposefully breaking off the antennas on their recorders to disable them. Perhaps unsurprisingly the majority of the sabotaged recorders were in the Southeast division - a low income, high minority area with a long history of excessive force complaints. One can imagine mandatory body cameras might suffer similar 'technical problems.' "

In the case of Ferguson, the department there says it didn't file the most basic record of the police shooting of Brown — a written police incident report. So whether they'd willfully choose to record video of such incidents before they happen is a question.

And if confrontations are recorded, will the records be released? That gets to the thorny video ownership question. As Kaste has reported:

"While police videos are generally considered public records, in practice, they're often difficult to obtain. Most cities refuse to turn over footage that is part of an investigation, and some are now instituting restrictions based on privacy concerns."

So even if the raw footage is captured, and police actually recorded a disputed incident, the police department or the city might not release it.

In short, cameras can help. But when the cops get to choose when they record and whether to release video, they clearly aren't a cure-all for the trust problems ailing law enforcement.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Playlist

  • "Mad Horses"
  • "Horse Heaven Hills"

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR
Odesza kicks off this week's edition of Metropolis. (Courtesy of the artist)

Metropolis: 8/30/14

Sep 2, 2014 (KCRW-FM)

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This Week's Tracklist

  • Odesza, "Sundara" (Counter)
  • Odesza, "Say My Name (feat. Zyra)" (Counter)
  • The 2 Bears, "Not This Time" (DFA)
  • London Grammar, "Hey Now (Zero 7 Remix)" (Columbia)
  • SBTRKT, "New Dorp New York (feat. Ezra Koenig)" (Young Turks)
  • Talking Heads, "Once In A Lifetime (Doc Martin Remix)" (Rhino)
  • Sleight Of Hands, "Seal The Deal" (Smoke N'Mirrors)
  • Lisa Shaw, "Like I Want To (Fred Everything Mix)" (Salted)
  • Redinho, "Playing With Fire" (Numbers)
  • Grimes, "Go" (4AD)
  • Hudson Mohawke, "Chimes" (Warp)
  • Com Truise, "Open" (Ghostly International)
  • Ali Love, "Deep Into The Night" (Crosstown Rebels)
  • Mr. Belt & Wezol, "Feel So Good"
  • Gorgon City, "Unmissable (Huxley Remix)" (Black Butter/Virgin)
  • Maceo Plex, "Conjure Superstar" (Kompakt)
  • Gabriel & Dresden, "New Ground" (Organized Nature)
  • Tensnake & Jacques Lu Cont, "Feel Of Love (Boyz Noise & Djedjotronic Mix)" (Astralwerks)
  • My Nu Leng, "Contact" (Black Butter)
  • Arcade Fire, "Afterlife (Flume Remix)" (Capitol)
  • Cyril Hahn, "Slow (feat. Rochelle Jordan)" (PMR)
  • Groove Armada, "Soho Disco" (Om)
  • Groove Armada, "Love Lights The Underground" (Om)
  • Zero 7, "Take Me Away" (Make)
  • Caribou, "Can't Do Without You" (Merge)
  • Les Sins, "Grind" (Jiaolong)
  • Kool & The Gang, "Summer Madness" (MVP)
Copyright 2014 KCRW-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kcrw.com.

Playlist

  • "Mad Horses"
  • "Horse Heaven Hills"

Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

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