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The crowd at Richie Havens' Woodstock-opening set on Aug. 15, 1969. (New York Daily News via Getty Images)

Richie Havens, Folk Singer Who Opened Woodstock, Has Died

Apr 22, 2013 (Morning Edition)

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Richie Havens in 1969.

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Richie Havens once told NPR that he believed all music is folk music. Listen to Havens speak about Woodstock, Greenwich Village and why he loved performing in Neda Ulaby's remembrance, broadcast on Morning Edition, at the audio link on this page.


Richie Havens, a Brooklyn-born singer who sang gospel as a teenager, began playing folk music in Greenwich Village clubs in the 1960s and was the opening act at the Woodstock Music & Art Fair in 1969, died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Jersey City, N.J., according to his agent. He was 72 years old.

Havens had a long career as a musician, but if he had done nothing else, his performance at Woodstock would secure his place in American music history. Havens was the first performer to walk onto the stage at the festival; he sat on a stool and performed for nearly two hours — including an improvisation that incorporated the spiritual "Motherless Child," later called "Freedom." It became a highlight of the documentary about the festival and introduced him to audiences around the world.

As a black performer, he was a rarity in the folk-dominated Greenwich Village scene. His sandpaper soft voice and percussive guitar playing caught the ear of folk impresario Albert Grossman, who first signed Bob Dylan and helped create Peter, Paul and Mary. Havens released his breakout album, Mixed Bag, in 1967.

Havens went on to act in films and on television, and he continued recording for more than 40 years. He had a Top 20 hit in 1971 with a cover of The Beatles' "Here Comes The Sun" and released his last album, Nobody Left to Crown, in 2008. But it was onstage — with his guitar — that Havens was in his element. He toured constantly and in 2008 told NPR that he never planned his shows beyond the opening and closing songs.

"Many times people have come up to me after and they'd, they'd say, 'Richie, do you know what you did?' I'd say, 'What?' They'd go, 'I wrote these songs down for you to sing and you sang 'em all in a row.' That's the kind of communication happens, you know," Havens said. "It's like if you let the audience lead, then you are the audience."

Havens connected with audiences from stages large and small for more than 50 years.

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