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Ron Finley, renegade gardener, says food is both the problem and the solution. (TED)

How Can You Give A Community Better Health?

by NPR/TED Staff
May 17, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Ron Finley's TEDTalk

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

About Ron Finley

Ron Finley grows a nourishing food culture in South Central LA's food desert by planting the seeds and tools for healthy eating. Finley's vision for a healthy, accessible "food forest" started with the curbside veggie garden he planted in the strip of dirt in front of his own house. When the city tried to shut it down, Finley's fight gave voice to a larger movement that provides nourishment, empowerment, education — and healthy, hopeful futures — one urban garden at a time.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Musician Amanda Palmer says she learned about trust and giving when she was a street performer. (TED)

How Do You Get People To Pay For Music?

by NPR/TED Staff
May 17, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Amanda Palmer's TEDTalk

Don't make people pay for music, says Amanda Palmer: Let them. In a passionate talk that begins in her days as a street performer, she examines the new relationship between artist and fan. Palmer believes we shouldn't fight the fact that digital content is freely shareable — and suggests that artists who give away their music for free can and should be directly supported by fans.

About Amanda Palmer

Alt-rock icon Amanda Palmer believes we shouldn't fight the fact that digital content is freely shareable — and suggests that artists can and should be directly supported by fans. Known for pushing boundaries in both her art and her lifestyle, Palmer made international headlines when she raised nearly $1.2 million via Kickstarter (she'd asked for $100,000) from nearly 25,000 fans who pre-ordered her album, Theatre Is Evil.

But the former street performer, then Dresden Dolls frontwoman, now solo artist hit a bump the week her world tour kicked off. She revealed plans to crowdsource additional local backup musicians in each tour stop, offering to pay them in hugs, merchandise and beer per her custom. Bitter and angry criticism ensued — she eventually promised to pay her local collaborators in cash. Summing up her business model, in which she views her recorded music as the digital equivalent of street performing, she says: "I firmly believe in music being as free as possible. Unlocked. Shared and spread. In order for artists to survive and create, their audiences need to step up and directly support them."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Dan Pallotta at the TED conference in 2013. (TED)

Do We Have The Wrong Idea About Charity?

by NPR/TED Staff
May 17, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Dan Pallotta's TEDTalk

Activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta calls out the double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities. Too many nonprofits, he says, are rewarded for how little they spend — not for what they get done. Instead of equating frugality with morality, he asks us to start rewarding charities for their big goals and big accomplishments, even if that comes with big expenses. In this talk, he says: Let's change the way we think about changing the world.

About Dan Pallotta

Everything the donating public has been taught about giving is dysfunctional, says AIDS Ride founder Dan Pallotta. He aims to transform the way society thinks about charity and giving and change. Pallotta says there's a double standard between the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Businesses are celebrated for risk-taking and focusing on financial incentive, while non-profits are sentenced to begging.

Pallotta believes the economic starvation of our nonprofits is why are not moving the needle on great social problems. Pallotta is best known for creating the multi-day charitable event industry, and a new generation of citizen philanthropists with the AIDS Rides and Breast Cancer 3-Day events, which raised $582 million in nine years. He is president of Advertising for Humanity, which helps foundations and philanthropists transform the growth potential of their favorite grantees.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Mark Bezos at TED University in 2011. (TED)

When Is the Right Time To Give?

by NPR/TED Staff
May 17, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Mark Bezos' TEDTalk

Volunteer firefighter Mark Bezos tells a story of an act of heroism that didn't go quite as expected — but that taught him a big lesson: Don't wait to be a hero. Give now.

About Mark Bezos

Mark Bezos works at Robin Hood, a poverty-fighting charity in New York City. Bezos is also the Assistant Captain of a volunteer fire company in Westchester County, New York, where he lives with his wife and four children.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Missing some content? Check the source: NPR
Copyright(c) 2014, NPR

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