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"I no longer want to postpone anything in life" - Ric Elias (TED)

What Runs Through Your Mind As Your Plane Is Crashing?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jun 28, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Turning Points.

About Ric Elias' TEDTalk

In January 2009, businessman Ric Elias had a front-row seat on Flight 1549, the plane that crash-landed in the Hudson River in New York. On the TED stage, Elias tells his story for the first time, including how the crash changed his approach to life, love and family.

About Ric Elias

Businessman Ric Elias was born in Puerto Rico and came to the United States to attend college. He is now the CEO and co-founder of Red Ventures, a firm that helps companies find new customers online.

In January 2009, his life changed when he found himself on Flight 1549, the plane that crash-landed in the Hudson River.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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"These thing that were a part of me before the crash, are still present in me" - Joshua Prager (TED)

Can Everything Change In An Instant?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jun 28, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Turning Points.

About Joshua Prager's TEDTalk

When Joshua Prager was 19, a devastating bus accident left him paralyzed on his left side. He returned to Israel twenty years later to find the driver who turned his world upside down. Prager tells his story and probes deep questions of identity, self-deception and destiny.

About Joshua Prager

Author and journalist Joshua Prager has created a career from telling stories of lives that changed in an instant. Over a decade-plus career at the Wall Street Journal, Prager began as a news assistant and worked his way up to senior writer.

While at the paper, Prager wrote about the world's only anonymous Pulitzer Prize winner, the unknown heir of the author of the children's book Goodnight Moon, and the backstory of how the 1951 New York Giants baseball team cheated their way to infamy, as told in his book The Echoing Green.

Today, Prager is focused on his own story: the 1990 bus accident that left him a hemiplegic at age 19. His new book Half-Life is about the accident and it explores identity and what it means to live a life changed in a single moment.

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"I am everything I am today, because of my past." - Maajid Nawaz (TED)

How Does An Islamist Extremist Change His Mind?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jun 28, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Turning Points.

About Maajid Nawaz's TEDTalk

For more than a decade, Maajid Nawaz recruited young Muslims to an extreme Islamist group. But while serving time in an Egyptian prison, he went through a complete ideological transformation. He left the group, his friends, his marriage for a new life as a democracy advocate.

About Maajid Nawaz

As a teenager, British-born Maajid Nawaz was recruited to an extremist global Islamist organization called Hizb ut-Tahrir, whose goal is to unite all Muslim countries into one caliphate ruled by Islamic law. He spent more than a decade recruiting other young Muslims to the group, until he was imprisoned in Egypt.

Four years later, Nawaz left prison feeling that Hizb ut-Tahrir was hijacking Islam for political purposes. He remained a Muslim, but he was no longer an Islamist.

He recently released a memoir, Radical: My Journey From Islamist Extremism To A Democratic Awakening. His goal now is to help Muslims work for a democratic culture that values peace and women's rights. He heads Quilliam, a think tank that engages in "counter-Islamist thought-generating."

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Sherwin Nuland speaking at TED. (TED)

What Does Electroshock Therapy Feel Like?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jun 28, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Turning Points. Watch Sherwin Nuland's other TEDTalk on hope.

About Sherwin Nuland's TEDTalk

Sherwin Nuland is a successful surgeon and author known for his bestselling books on the nature of life and death. But 40 years ago, he faced spending the rest of his life in a mental institution. Nuland describes how electroshock therapy gave him a second lease on life.

About Sherwin Nuland

Sherwin Nuland was a practicing surgeon for 30 years and treated more than 10,000 patients. He then turned to writing about life, death, morality and aging, exploring what there is to people beyond their anatomy.

His 1995 book How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter demystifies the process of dying. Through stories of real patients and his own family, he examines the seven most common causes of death and their effects. The book won the National Book Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is The Art of Aging: A Doctor's Prescription for Well-Being.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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