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Jennifer Pahlka speaking about Code for America at the TED conference. (TED)

Can You Code A Better Government?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jul 12, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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NPR/TED Staff

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jennifer Pahlka's TEDTalk

Can government be run like the Internet, permissionless and open? Coder and activist Jennifer Pahlka believes it can — and that apps, built quickly and cheaply, are a powerful new way to connect citizens to their governments — and their neighbors.

About Jennifer Pahlka

Jennifer Pahlka is the founder of Code for America, which matches software geniuses with US cities to reboot local services. Recently, she ran the Web 2.0 and Gov 2.0 events for TechWeb and co-chaired the successful Web 2.0 Expo. She's currently serving as the Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Government Innovation at the White House.

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Work doesn't happen at the office, says Jason Fried. (TED)

Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jul 12, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jason Fried's TEDTalk

Software entrepreneur Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn't a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems and offers suggestions to make work work.

About Jason Fried

Jason Fried thinks deeply about collaboration, productivity and the nature of work. He's the co-founder of 37signals, which builds web-based collaboration tools. Fried is the co-author of the book Rework, which examines new ways to conceptualize working and creating.

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Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, speaking at TED. (TED)

Why Does Wikipedia Work?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jul 12, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jimmy Wales' TEDTalk

Founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales recalls how he assembled "a ragtag band of volunteers," gave them tools for collaborating to create a self-organizing, self-correcting, never-finished online encyclopedia.

About Jimmy Wales

Jimmy Wales is one of the founders of Wikipedia, the self-organizing, self-correcting online encyclopedia anyone can edit. After Wikipedia's launch in 2001, it became one of the most used repositories of knowledge on the planet, with more than one million articles in English and hundreds of thousands in dozens of other languages, all freely available.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Luis von Ahn speaking at TEDxCMU (TED)

Can You Crowdsource Without Even Knowing It?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jul 12, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Luis Von Ahn's TEDTalk

Computer programmer Luis von Ahn wondered how else to use small contributions done by millions on the Internet for greater good. He put CAPTCHAs, those online puzzles to verify you're not a robot, to work by digitizing books and teaching foreign languages.

About Luis Von Ahn

Luis von Ahn builds systems that combine humans and computers to solve large-scale problems that neither can solve alone. Von Ahn is an associate professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, and he's at the forefront of the crowdsourcing craze. His work takes advantage of the evergrowing Web-connected population to achieve collaboration in unprecedented numbers. His projects aim to leverage the crowd for human good. His company reCAPTCHA, sold to Google in 2009, digitizes books with the help of CAPTCHAs, the online word puzzles used to verify a user is a human. His new project is Duolingo, which aims to get 100 million people translating the Web in every major language.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Clay Shirky speaking at TED. (TED)

What Motivates Us To Collaborate?

by NPR/TED Staff
Jul 12, 2013 (TED Radio Hour)

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Clay Shirky's TEDTalk

Social media guru Clay Shirky looks at "cognitive surplus" — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we're busy contributing to the web in our small ways, we're building a better, more cooperative world.

About Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky's work focuses on the rising usefulness of networks — using decentralized technologies such as peer-to-peer sharing, wireless, software for social creation, and open-source development. New technologies are enabling new kinds of cooperative structures to flourish as a way of getting things done in all fields as an alternative to centralized and institutional structures, which he sees as limiting.

Shirky is an adjunct professor in New York University's graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program. He's the author of Here Comes Everybody and Cognitive Surplus: Creativity And Generosity In A Connected Age.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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