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New And Returning Faces Reflect On The March On Washington

by Chloe Coleman
Aug 24, 2013

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Diamond Styles (left) and Karla Styles Vickie Leonard Judith Howell Gerald Bundy Josephine Ball Gerald Bundy of Philadelphia was 13 when his older cousin convinced him to go to the March on Washington in 1963. Bundy returned 50 years later to celebrate the anniversary. When he looks back on it now he believes the experience, "made me more cognizant of social justice; made me an activist."

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Chloe Coleman

Tens of thousands of people congregated in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — one of the largest civil rights rallies in American history, and the day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his indelible "I Have A Dream" speech.

Wandering around the National Mall with my camera allowed me to envision what it would have been like to attend the original event in 1963. I set out into the crowd and found people who were there on that day 50 years ago — as well as many others who were there for the first time.

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