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Carol Levine, Championing The Caregiver's Cause

Jul 21, 2008 (Fresh Air from WHYY)

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For 17 years, home health-care advocate Carol Levine never truly left her job. Levine spent her work days at the United Hospital Fund, focusing on the needs of family caregivers. When she came home, she devoted her time to caring for her housebound husband, who was seriously injured in a car accident in 1990.

In 2007, Levine's husband died. It was, she tells Terry Gross, as if she had lost her husband twice: once in the accident, and then once again when he actually died.

Levine is the Director of the Families and Health Care Project of the United Hospital Fund. She also directs The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic, which she founded in 1991.

From 1987 to 1991, Levine was the director of the Citizens Commission on AIDS in New York City. She also served as a senior staff member of The Hastings Center, where she edited the Hastings Center Report. She received a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship for her work in AIDS policy and ethics in 1993.

Levine also edited the book Always On Call: When Illness Turns Families Into Caregivers.

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