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Cholera victim in Zimbabwe (DESMOND KWANDE/AFP/Getty Images)

More Problems for Zimbabwe

Dec 9, 2008

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Reported by

Michel Martin

Sorry to skip past today and move right to tomorrow, but we are working on a number of fronts for tomorrow's program.

Groups of former heads of state and distinguished world citizens, known as The Elders (we've had several members of the group on the program before), issued a major cry for help on behalf of Zimbabwe. In addition to — and because of — months of political chaos, the region now suffers from a major cholera epidemic. Former President Jimmy Carter was on NPR's Morning Edition today to talk about this. But there were others who were part of the mission to Zimbabwe, and we are trying to get someone folks who are in position to speak with us.

We're also watching several political stories: Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, as Lee Hill mentioned on the blog this morning, has been arrested on corruption charges and Rep. William Jefferson recently lost the Louisiana Congressional seat he held for many terms to Anh Cao, who will become the first Vietnamese American elected to Congress.

And stories about, or informed by, religion continue to interest us, including the move by conservative Anglicans to form a breakaway communion. Also, we're still following the fight over the Proposition 8 ballot initiative outlawing gay marriage in California as it continues to reverberate.

Not saying we will actually have all guests for all of these. We're just trying to figure out how to cover these stories.

Let's not forget about the holidays. We have a great guest for later in the week who will talk about one of the upcoming holiday movies. I'll give you a hint: "To Wong Foo ..."

I bet that doesn't help at all, does it?

HA!

Question for next week's parenting segment, when we'll continue our discussion about parenting books:

Do you have a favorite parenting book or guide? Can you let us know, especially in time to consider it/look it over for the segment?

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