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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Science

Aug 21, 2014 — Look up at the night sky and ask, "Anybody there?" Then consider this answer (from the 1830s): There are 22 trillion individuals in our solar system.
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Aug 19, 2014 — In his new memoir, Doctored, Sandeep Jauhar describes a growing discontent among doctors and how it's affecting patients. He says rushed doctors are often practicing "defensive medicine."
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Aug 18, 2014 — Author Adam Rogers says there are lots of myths about what causes hangovers. His new book, Proof: The Science of Booze, explores these and other scientific mysteries of alcohol's effect on the body.
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Aug 17, 2014 — Forget what CSI told you about the job: It's less about solving crimes and more about accidents. Judy Melinek hopes to paint a more accurate picture of the profession in her new book, Working Stiff.
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Aug 5, 2014 — The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is spreading at a frightening rate. To find out why this outbreak has been so deadly and what may lie ahead, we spoke with science writer David Quammen.
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Aug 1, 2014 — In Thinking In Numbers, Daniel Tammet uses everyday examples to illustrate the way numbers and equations form the basis of our lives. It appears at No. 12.
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Jul 30, 2014 — Our quest for knowledge will never end because we just can't know everything, no matter how hard we try, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser. But that's a good thing. Here's why.
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Jul 28, 2014 — Birds are everywhere, but the greatest concentration of different birds — the "bird mecca" of America — is not in our great parks, not in our forests, not where you'd suppose. Not at all.
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Jul 25, 2014 — Debuting at No. 12, Vicki Constantine Croke's Elephant Company tells the story of an English soldier who used elephants to undermine Japanese occupation of Burma during World War II.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Joshua Wolf Shenk says it's time to debunk the myth of the lone genius. His new book explores creative partnerships — and explains how Emily Dickinson wasn't actually as much of a loner as we think.
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