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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Sports

Jul 12, 2014 — Mark Miller chose his nickname because when he smells blood, he attacks. His new memoir, Pain Don't Hurt, tells of the heart surgery and alcohol problems that temporarily derailed his fighting career.
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Jun 23, 2014 — NPR's go-to books guru shares some "under the radar" reads. Several of her recommendations — including fiction, fantasy and nonfiction — will make you reconsider your definition of a map.
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Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 13, 2014 — In One Summer, Bill Bryson looks at historical events — featuring the likes of Charles Lindbergh and Babe Ruth — from the summer of 1927. It appears at No. 10.
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Jun 6, 2014 — The World Cup begins next week in Brazil. Before it gets going, check out the work of an author who has spent decades writing about Latin America, and who has a particular affinity for soccer.
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Jun 6, 2014 — In The Boys in the Boat, Daniel James Brown tells the story of the American rowing team that defeated elite rivals at Hitler's 1936 Berlin Olympics. It appears at No. 1.
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Jun 5, 2014 — At the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, former jockey Donna Barton Brothers will interview the winner on horseback. Now an analyst for NBC, Brothers won more than 1,100 races before retiring in 1998.
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May 16, 2014 — In his memoir, the catcher opens up about getting drafted in the 62nd round, his feud with Roger Clemens and what it's like to go into retirement. Leaving the game, he says, was "like a small death."
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May 6, 2014 — The New York Yankees relief pitcher is revered both for what he did and what he didn't do — behave scandalously, pick fights, take drugs or chase big contract offers to other cities.
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Apr 12, 2014 — Nonfiction shelves are full of memoirs by people who can't actually write. They're brought to you by authors who suppress their own ego to write in a famous voice — in exchange for a hefty check.
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