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April 21, 2014 | NPR · More than 200 people remain missing after the ferry capsized last week. One family was told their daughter was dead instead of missing. It turns out authorities had confused her for another girl.
 
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April 21, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.
 
April 21, 2014 | NPR · Hamid Mir, one of Pakistan's most famous journalists, was shot and wounded by gunmen as he was driving down a busy street in Karachi. It's the second such attack this month on a journalist.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
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April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Research News

Apr 19, 2014 — From increased depression and suicidal thoughts to social isolation and lower socioeconomic status, the negative consequences of being bullied can last well into middle age, a large study suggests.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Workers who have a creative outlet outside the office are more likely to be creative problem solvers on the job, a study suggests. Oh, and they have more fun.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"— where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
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Apr 17, 2014 — It turns out the first chili peppers were grown by humans in eastern Mexico. And it's not the same region where beans and corn were first grown, according to new ways of evaluating evidence.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Scientists based their technique on the one used to create the sheep Dolly years ago. These cells might one day be useful in treating all sorts of diseases.
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Apr 17, 2014 — The domesticated chili pepper is the most widely grown spice crop in the world. A team of researchers at the University of California Davis has discovered the origin of that pepper.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Analysis of innovation at private companies in the U.S. and across the world finds an inverse relationship correlation between disruptive innovation and the age of managers at those companies.
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Apr 16, 2014 — A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
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Apr 16, 2014 — The Smithsonian is set to unpack something it's never had before: a rare, nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. It's a gift from a Montana museum that says this T. rex deserves to be famous.
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Apr 15, 2014 — To see if low blood sugar sours even good relationships, scientists used an unusual tool: voodoo dolls representing spouses. As hunger levels rose, so did the number of pins.
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