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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Aug 29, 2014 — Youth Radio's Myles Bess lived through the aftermath of the 2009 police shooting of an unarmed young black man, Oscar Grant, in Oakland, Calif. — and sees parallels in Ferguson, Mo., today.
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Aug 28, 2014 — When the Colombian actress appeared in a widely derided stunt at the Emmys, much of the attendant outrage centered on her very prominent image. Juan Vidal argues this lets Hollywood off the hook.
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Aug 24, 2014 — When Darnell Moore was a teenager in the late '80s, a group of boys doused him in gasoline and tried to light him on fire. One of his attackers was his next-door neighbor.
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Aug 23, 2014 — James Foley's murder by the Islamic State raises questions about the risks journalists take to report from conflict zones. NPR's Scott Simon remembers the mixed motives and rewards of the job.
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Aug 22, 2014 — The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
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Aug 16, 2014 — Audiences treasured his tremendous comic energy. But, says NPR's Scott Simon, Williams' death this week reminds us that depression can affect anyone.
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Aug 15, 2014 — Patsy Hathaway, who is white, thought "love would conquer all" when it came to how others would treat her adopted son, Alex Landau. That changed after he was severely beaten by police when he was 19.
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Aug 13, 2014 — What does it take to be a man? In writer Matt de la Pea's family, it's meeting your woman in a traditionally macho way. Until now, he hasn't told them how he really met his wife eight years ago.
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Aug 9, 2014 — When NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro returned home with post-traumatic stress disorder after covering the Iraq War, she found comfort at the Mexico City pound in the form of Ursa.
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Aug 8, 2014 — In 1987, Mytokia Fair shot and killed her husband — before battered spouse syndrome was an admissible defense in Maryland. She served three years in prison before her 15-year sentence was commuted.
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