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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its DNA. But it's still unclear what these mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Low-Wage America

Jul 21, 2010 — The Obama administration has pledged to end childhood hunger in the U.S. by 2015. Millions of kids cannot get enough to eat at home, and that number is going up, not down. NPR's Pam Fessler and Share our Strength founder Bill Shore talk about childhood hunger and the tug of war between nutrition and frugality.
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Jul 20, 2010 — The Williamsons of Carlisle, Pa., live well below the poverty line. And in the family's struggle to obtain enough food, nutrition sometimes takes a back seat to necessity. Hunger in America is complicated. It's not just getting enough food, but getting the right food — and making the right choices.
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Jul 19, 2010 — President Obama has pledged to end childhood hunger by 2015. But the number of hungry children in America has been rising: In 2008, almost 17 million children lived in households where getting enough food was a challenge. The Williamson family of five in Carlisle, Pa., who make $18,000 a year, highlight this struggle.
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May 12, 2010 — This morning The Walmart Foundation announced a plan to donate $2 billion over the next five years in cash and food to food banks around the United States. The move marks an expansion of Walmart's existing partnerships with the organization Feeding America. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with NPR poverty and philanthropy correspondent Pam Fessler about the donation.
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Jan 23, 2010 — Haiti's government says it is ending the search and rescue phase for survivors, following last week's magnitude-7 earthquake. But rescue crews won't be kept from continuing their work. Meanwhile, Haitians are trying to flee their destroyed capital by the tens of thousands, with living conditions in Port-au-Prince now primitive at best. NPR's Jason Beaubien speaks to guest host Audie Cornish from the Caribbean island's docks.
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Jul 15, 2009 — In all, 21 Chrysler and General Motors plants will be closed permanently or idled over the next few years. In addition to the loss of thousands of jobs, the closures can mean a substantial drop in tax revenue for affected communities. Some cities converted the vacant auto plants into other businesses in an attempt to reinvent their economies.
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Jul 14, 2009 — When Congress passed a new law to give people up to $4,500 to junk their old cars and buy new, more efficient ones, the auto industry cheered. But some charities say they'll be the unintended victims of this program, and so will the low-income people they try to help.
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Jul 11, 2009 — Summers in Phoenix can be long and lethal for those who can't escape the heat. Those who live in it say the heat makes them irritable, disoriented and unable to eat. Even at night, the temperature can hover in the lower 90s.
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Jul 7, 2009 — Some economists say the additional $20 billion allocated to the federal food stamp program is a smart way to boost spending in a recession — especially with 4.8 million new people getting aid. But critics say a real economic kick-start will take a lot more money.
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Jul 2, 2009 — In Sacramento, hundreds of homeless demonstrate in hopes of securing land to sleep on. In recent months a tent city and a city shelter have closed. With laws that prohibit sleeping in public places, these individuals say it is now illegal for them to exist.
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