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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Summer Reading: Nonfiction

Jul 26, 2009 — This book reveals how the American food industry has harnessed the chemistry of sugar, salt and fat to make us eat too much, too fast and too often.
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Jun 24, 2009 — Richard Rayner's nonfiction account of Los Angeles in the 1920s demonstrates the truth behind the noir.
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Jun 11, 2009 — Kao Kalia Yang's memoir is both a family chronicle and a history of the Hmong people.
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Jun 8, 2009 — D.D. Guttenplan's biography of iconic investigative reporter I.F. Stone is well-researched and gracefully written. American Radical gets inside the head and heart of this anti-establishment journalist who became a Washington insider.
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Aug 15, 2008 — Half shantytown, half boomtown, the teeming and complex Mexican capital defies coherent description. David Lida's sharply drawn vignettes are expansive and vivid — like the city itself.
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Aug 6, 2008Stop Me If You've Heard This Before, Jim Holt's funny, scholarly history of humor, ranges high and (very) low to answer the question, "What are you laughing at?"
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Jul 3, 2008 — Like most things that happen in the bedroom, the collection of essays found in Dirty Words is fun, naughty and totally inappropriate for the eyes of children.
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Jun 17, 2008 — Primary season is (finally) over, summer is (almost officially) here and, as Publishers Weekly reports, a new crop of political books is about to make its way to the stores. Hankering for a political classic? Check out our favorite books of all time.
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Jun 10, 2008 — In 1985, a single bottle of wine purported to be from Thomas Jefferson's own cellar was sold at auction for $156,000. Benjamin Wallace traces the mystery surrounding the bottle in The Billionaire's Vinegar.
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May 27, 2008 — While there's definite comfort to be had in the familiar authors, sometimes what you really want is the spark and thrill of a chance encounter — that's where first books come in.
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more Summer Reading: Nonfiction from NPR