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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely-watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's sparked a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · On Sunday, Iraqi and Kurdish forces broke a nearly 80-day siege by the Islamic State on the town of Amerli, where residents now have enough food and water for the first time in weeks.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to journalist Shane Harris about his Foreign Policy story on "Lady al-Qaida," Aafia Siddiqui. The Pakistani-born woman was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Summer Reading: Nonfiction

Jul 26, 2009 — This book reveals how the American food industry has harnessed the chemistry of sugar, salt and fat to make us eat too much, too fast and too often.
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Jun 24, 2009 — Richard Rayner's nonfiction account of Los Angeles in the 1920s demonstrates the truth behind the noir.
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Jun 11, 2009 — Kao Kalia Yang's memoir is both a family chronicle and a history of the Hmong people.
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Jun 8, 2009 — D.D. Guttenplan's biography of iconic investigative reporter I.F. Stone is well-researched and gracefully written. American Radical gets inside the head and heart of this anti-establishment journalist who became a Washington insider.
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Aug 15, 2008 — Half shantytown, half boomtown, the teeming and complex Mexican capital defies coherent description. David Lida's sharply drawn vignettes are expansive and vivid — like the city itself.
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Aug 6, 2008Stop Me If You've Heard This Before, Jim Holt's funny, scholarly history of humor, ranges high and (very) low to answer the question, "What are you laughing at?"
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Jul 3, 2008 — Like most things that happen in the bedroom, the collection of essays found in Dirty Words is fun, naughty and totally inappropriate for the eyes of children.
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Jun 17, 2008 — Primary season is (finally) over, summer is (almost officially) here and, as Publishers Weekly reports, a new crop of political books is about to make its way to the stores. Hankering for a political classic? Check out our favorite books of all time.
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Jun 10, 2008 — In 1985, a single bottle of wine purported to be from Thomas Jefferson's own cellar was sold at auction for $156,000. Benjamin Wallace traces the mystery surrounding the bottle in The Billionaire's Vinegar.
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May 27, 2008 — While there's definite comfort to be had in the familiar authors, sometimes what you really want is the spark and thrill of a chance encounter — that's where first books come in.
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more Summer Reading: Nonfiction from NPR