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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Summer Reading: Nonfiction

Jul 26, 2009 — This book reveals how the American food industry has harnessed the chemistry of sugar, salt and fat to make us eat too much, too fast and too often.
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Jun 24, 2009 — Richard Rayner's nonfiction account of Los Angeles in the 1920s demonstrates the truth behind the noir.
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Jun 11, 2009 — Kao Kalia Yang's memoir is both a family chronicle and a history of the Hmong people.
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Jun 8, 2009 — D.D. Guttenplan's biography of iconic investigative reporter I.F. Stone is well-researched and gracefully written. American Radical gets inside the head and heart of this anti-establishment journalist who became a Washington insider.
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Aug 15, 2008 — Half shantytown, half boomtown, the teeming and complex Mexican capital defies coherent description. David Lida's sharply drawn vignettes are expansive and vivid — like the city itself.
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Aug 6, 2008Stop Me If You've Heard This Before, Jim Holt's funny, scholarly history of humor, ranges high and (very) low to answer the question, "What are you laughing at?"
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Jul 3, 2008 — Like most things that happen in the bedroom, the collection of essays found in Dirty Words is fun, naughty and totally inappropriate for the eyes of children.
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Jun 17, 2008 — Primary season is (finally) over, summer is (almost officially) here and, as Publishers Weekly reports, a new crop of political books is about to make its way to the stores. Hankering for a political classic? Check out our favorite books of all time.
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Jun 10, 2008 — In 1985, a single bottle of wine purported to be from Thomas Jefferson's own cellar was sold at auction for $156,000. Benjamin Wallace traces the mystery surrounding the bottle in The Billionaire's Vinegar.
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May 27, 2008 — While there's definite comfort to be had in the familiar authors, sometimes what you really want is the spark and thrill of a chance encounter — that's where first books come in.
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more Summer Reading: Nonfiction from NPR